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Hyperledger Quilt

Onward and Upward for Hyperledger in 2018

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Quilt, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As 2017 comes to a close, it’s beneficial to look back and reflect on the progress we have made, and where we will see evolution and growth in the new year. This year, the world has acknowledged distributed ledgers and smart contracts as transformative technologies with tremendous potential to impact how business is conducted in many industries. Within  Hyperledger, the technology foundations have now been set. In the coming year, that will turn into more production software releases, real world implementations, and the first real business returns on our collective intellectual and financial investment.  

Below are a few observations from the year, milestones and thoughts on what will come in 2018.

Blockchain maturation and more production implementations

  • Companies large and small, IT vendors and end-user organizations, consortiums and NGOs, everyone took notice of Hyperledger in 2017 and made moves to get involved. This was evident in the ever increasing Hyperledger membership, which nearly doubled in size. We sold out of our Premier memberships at 21 total, adding eight new companies just this year including SAP, American Express, Daimler, Change Healthcare, NEC, Cisco, Tradeshift and Baidu. Hyperledger now has support from 197 organizations, and remains the fastest growing open source project ever hosted by The Linux Foundation. This has given Hyperledger a very solid footing financially, enabling us to double the resources we can apply towards building and supporting the community in 2018.
  • We have grown our Associate Member ranks to include organizations as diverse as Mercy Corps, the National Association of Realtors, the Illinois Blockchain Initiative, and the Monetary Authority of Singapore.  These relationships are key to extending Hyperledger’s reach into different sectors and environments.
  • Attesting to our focus on developing code suitable for enterprise use, this year saw the launch of the first production ready Hyperledger blockchain framework, Hyperledger Fabric 1.0. This was a true community effort pulling together contributions from more than 100 different developers and 30 different companies. As one result, we have 45 members listed in our Vendor Directory, providing products and services based on Hyperledger technology.
  • We have seen substantial uptick in POCs, pilots and production implementations of Hyperledger technologies, many of which are being tracked at the PoC Tracker on the Hyperledger website. Just a few examples of projects building in Hyperledger code include:
    • The Monetary Authority of Singapore’s Project Ubin, implementing an RTGS system;
    • the soon-to-be-production diamond supply chain tracking system implemented by Everledger, SAP and IBM;
    • and the Plastic Bank, a plastics recycling initiative.

In 2018, we will see:

  • more 1.0 milestones made next year by various Hyperledger projects;
  • more production deployments: for example, Change Healthcare, has announced an early 2018 go-live for their claims processing blockchain built on Hyperledger Fabric;
  • a growing Hyperledger staff and presence at events, creating more content, supporting a growing set of projects and working groups;
  • and more membership growth. We are reaching out to a broader set of industries than ever, and are deepening our relationships with our existing members.  

The fast expanding developer and end-user community will continue to grow

  • Demand for developers, and developer interest in Hyperledger, has exploded. We are now seeing sold-out Hyperledger meetups in dozens of cities, strong attendance at our semi-monthly HackFests held around the world, thousands of participants on our email and chat networks, non-stop requests for speakers at conferences, and of course more and more code flowing into our repositories.
  • We launched the first Hyperledger online training course this year: Blockchain for Business – An Introduction to Hyperledger Technologies. Currently, there are  44,966 total enrollments, and 1,074 learners have completed the course with a passing grade. We have an average of 2,500 new enrollments per week. The course is second only in growth to the original intro to Linux operating system course launched by The Linux Foundation. We have now launched a Training and Education Working Group to involve core maintainers and other volunteers in the development of additional courseware.
  • 150 people participated in the Hyperledger Member Summit in November in Singapore, representing 83 different member companies.  

In 2018, we will see:

  • the development of additional training courses and certification options;
  • more frequent and larger face to face developer gatherings;
  • and more developer activity across additional Hyperledger projects.

Integration, standards and interoperability will take center focus

In 2018, we will see:

  • The industry get a lot more serious about interoperability above the layer of the DLT, and looking for simple and open cross-blockchain approaches, leading them to Hyperledger Quilt and the rest of our community;
  • and our projects explore integration and interoperability with each other even further, allowing a greater number of options to be available to developers.

We’re proud of the work our vibrant and diverse community has accomplished this year. We have made great strides and could not be more thankful to everyone who has played a part in this success. It goes without saying the stakes can be even higher in open source, it’s a balance of creating a welcoming, collaborative environment and at the same time making sure everyone gets a say and all voices are heard. We strongly believe the open governance model that Hyperledger naturally inherited from The Linux Foundation has been a crucial part of the continued success of the project.

Finally, you can stay up to date with all Hyperledger news here or follow us on Twitter. We hold regular hackfests for Hyperledger, so be sure to check out the events page and join us for the next one. You can also plug into the Hyperledger Community at github, Rocket.Chat, the wiki or our mailing list.

Here’s to a successful 2018!

 

Developer Showcase Series: Nathan Aw, NTT DATA

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Quilt

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Nathan Aw, who is a Digital Advisory & Solutions Manager, of Emerging Technologies & Innovation Practice at NTT DATA.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

Build software like how we build our houses. Architects draw detailed plans before a brick is laid or a nail is hammered. Programmers and software engineers seldom do – perhaps this is why programs crash more often than houses collapse?

In practical terms, it means… spend a lot of time on writing (thinking) specifications, devising blueprints. For programmers who are building on top of say Hyperledger Fabric, read and understand the protocol specifications. Thereafter write your own specifications for your program. I cannot over emphasize the importance of clarity of thought before one starts building on Hyperledger.

Nathan Aw, NTT Data

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

I am working on Hyperledger Quilt. I got into blockchain purely by chance. Back in college my favorite Computer Science (CS) modules were distributed systems and cryptography (hashing, digital signatures, public-key cryptosystems). When I graduated, I found myself working on middleware (Integration – SOA, AMQP, OSB, etc). When blockchain arrived at the scene, all the stars aligned – I suddenly found my favorite subjects in school and my experience in middleware aligned.  

What project in Hyperledger are you working on? Any new developments to share? Can you sum up your experience with Hyperledger?

Hyperledger Quilt. Amazing community – full of passionate folks who are willing to lend a helping hand. The mailing list is so responsive.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

Cross chain interoperability. scalability and security.

As Hyperledger’s incubated projects start maturing and hit 1.0s and beyond, what are the most interesting technologies, apps, or use cases coming out as a result from your perspective?

I find the use cases of diamond supply chain and verifiable IDs for refugees most interesting.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

I hope blockchain can help usher in a new age of trustless paradigm. People no longer need to trust organizations but instead trust the software, the cryptographic proof, the process. Blockchain ideally should bring people closer than before – collaboration and cooperation for the betterment of mankind.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

I hope to see blockchain deployed in all the major industries, the major sectors and on a global scale.

What is the best piece of developer advice you’ve ever received?

Build Software like how we build our houses!

What technology could you not live without?

Blockchain – To be more specific, Hyperledger. (I mean it!)

 

Nathan Aw Ming Kun is a Digital Advisory & Solutions Manager with NTT Data whose primary focus is on Blockchain technologies and other fast emerging technologies such as Robotics Process Automation (RPA). In his current role, he designs and delivers blockchain solutions for his clients. He is also an active participant in the open source collaborative ecosystem such as the Hyperledger Project, among many others. His passion is to help organisations quickly identify, adopt and scale digital technologies thereby pushing the digital frontier and capturing its full value. Nathan Aw brings with him 6 years of enterprise software and implementation experience from leading companies such as NTT Data, Accenture and Oracle.

Hyperledger Gets Cozy With Quilt

By | Blog, Hyperledger Quilt

We’re thrilled to welcome yet another project under Hyperledger, Quilt. Hyperledger Quilt started around 18 months ago and is a Java implementation of the Interledger protocol. Interledger, also known as ILP, is a protocol for making transactions across ledgers. The protocol’s standards and specifications are being defined by the open source community under the World Wide Web Consortium umbrella. With the addition of Quilt to Hyperledger, the Linux Foundation now hosts both the Java (Quilt) and JavaScript (Interledger.js) Interledger implementations. The JS Foundation welcomed Interledger.js in 2016.

As an open consortium, Hyperledger incubates a range of business blockchain technologies, including distributed ledger frameworks, smart contract engines, client libraries, graphical interfaces, utility libraries and sample applications. Quilt is the latest project to join this vast community.

What is Hyperledger Quilt?

Hyperledger Quilt offers interoperability between ledger systems by implementing ILP, which is primarily a payments protocol and is designed to transfer value across systems – both distributed ledgers and non-distributed ledgers. It is a simple protocol that establishes a global namespace for accounts, as well as, a protocol for synchronized atomic swaps between different systems.

Why Quilt?

Ledger systems today are siloed and disconnected. Transfers of value are relatively easy within one country, or if the sender and recipient have accounts on the same network or ledger. But sending value to someone on a different network or ledger is complex and often impractical. Where connections between ledgers do exist, they are manual, slow or expensive.

The Interledger protocol is based on concepts dating back to the 1970s and 1980s, but it took the advent of Bitcoin and the global blockchain movement to make the world realize that money and value transfers could be reinvented with Internet based technologies.

Internet protocols enable information to be packetized, routed and delivered over communication networks. With ILP, money and other forms of value can be packetized, routed and delivered over payment networks and ledgers. Hyperledger Quilt is an enterprise grade implementation of the protocol, developed in Java, and providing libraries and reference implementations of the core Interledger components and in time ledger integrations for other Hyperledger projects.

Technical Details of Quilt

The idea is that Quilt will become a ledger interoperability solution for Hyperledger projects. This will enable Hyperledger members’ distributed ledger solutions, financial institutions’ private ledgers, IoT companies’ wallets, and supply chain systems to connect with one another to perform distributed atomic transactions.

By implementing the Interledger protocol, Quilt provides:

  • A set of rules for enabling ledger interoperability with basic escrow semantics
  • A standard for a ledger-independent address format and data packet format that will enable connectors to route payments
  • A framework for designing higher level use-case-specific protocols

Who will work on Quilt?

Everis, NTT DATA and Ripple are committing full-time engineering resources to ensure the success of this project. The main contributors will include Takahiro Inaba (NTT DATA), Adrian Hope-Bailie (Ripple) and Isaac Arruebarrena (Everis, an NTT DATA Company).

Many other members have already expressed interest in backing the development of Quilt’s Java implementation. This team will seek to work with the other Hyperledger projects in order to find ways to enable ledger interoperability across Hyperledger’s DLT solutions and institutions’ centralised ledgers. Other engineers from NTT DATA, Everis and Ripple will also contribute to the project over time. Members of the Interledger Payments Community Group have also shown interest in contributing to the development of this ILP implementation.

Getting started with Quilt

There will be repositories on GitHub to manage Quilt resources – they will become available over the next several weeks. You can watch for them here: hyperledger/quilt and hyperledger/quilt-crypto-conditions.

Quilt is an exciting addition for the Hyperledger community.  As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts on Quilt as well as other projects, via github, Rocket.Chat, the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.