Category

Hyperledger Sawtooth

(7.11.17) Computerworld: Linux group pushes out production-ready blockchain collaboration software

By | Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Sawtooth, News

The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger announced today the availability of Fabric 1.0, a collaboration tool for building blockchain distributed ledger business networks  such as smart contract technology.

The Hyperledger project, a collaborative cross-industry effort created to advance blockchain technology, said the Hyperledger Fabric framework can be a foundation for developing blockchain applications, products or customized business solutions

More here.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are June updates on Hyperledger projects.

Hyperledger Burrow

  • Implementation of dynamic memory on the Ethereum Virtual Machine
  • New type-safe Application Binary Interface package for translating data to Ethereum contracts into packed Ethereum bytes for transaction formulation (logical requirement for Ethereum chain; but all package implementations thus far have been GPLv3 licensed, as such in tooling code not included in Burrow; this new package will be able to go into Hyperledger Burrow under Apache license)
  • Alpha of batching client for new API with high transaction throughput (> 400 tx/s)
  • Various bug fixes
  • First prototype of Burrow EVM to run as transaction processor on Hyperledger Sawtooth Ledger

Hyperledger Cello

  • A user dashboard was added to support seeing blockchain status and chaincodes.
  • The k8s support features was started with intern students; Upgrade swarm support to latest version (17.04).
  • Refine the installation scripts to support multi-os-distributions.
  • Fabric 1.0-* supported scripts was added.

Hyperledger Composer

  • We completed all rebranding activities as part of the move to Hyperledger – we moved to the Hyperledger Docker Hub organization, and renamed the Yeoman generator module.
  • We added support for modelling and publishing events from a transaction processor function, allowing client applications and existing systems to respond to events from a deployed business network.
  • We made extensive changes to our new user and getting started documentation, including reworked installation guides and tutorials which are available in the docs: https://hyperledger.github.io/composer/introduction/introduction.html
  • We delivered a set of nodes for Node-RED which allow developers to easily build outbound and inbound integration between a deployed business network and external system using IoT/MQTT, WebSockets, TCP, etc.
  • We added experimental support for invoking external HTTP APIs from within a transaction processor function, allowing external data such as share prices to be used within business logic.
  • We are currently focusing on delivering Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 beta support, complex query support (by exploiting CouchDB), and a new vehicle lifecycle demo that shows off the power of Composer.

Hyperledger Explorer

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Fabric

  • Hyperledger Fabric v1.0.0-beta was released, and the maintainers plan on weekly releases until we have a demonstrably stable release candidate. We hope to be able to release in late July if all goes well.
  • The project’s engineers have significantly increased test coverage (+82%) and reduced its open defect count (~130 -> 22) since the 1.0.0-alpha2 release. It has been encouraging to see the diversity of contributions. It the past month alone, we have had contributions from 73 individuals representing 12 companies (including IBM) and 12 unaffiliated individuals.
  • The project is seeing a steadily increasing stream of downloads of the milestone releases with global coverage (US, Brazil, China, India, UK, Germany, France, Croatia, Russia, Japan, Indonesia, Australia and even Pakistan). There is an abundance of interest in China, India and Japan, nearly rivaling the US.
  • The remaining focus is on improving the documentation, continuing to test and fix bugs, and complete the various license, crypto-export and security scans.

Hyperledger Indy

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Iroha

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Sawtooth

  • Graduated to Active status! 
  • Project page new and improved, now with demo networks: https://www.hyperledger.org/projects/sawtooth
  • Collaborating with Hyperledger Burrow to integrate EVM with Sawtooth.
  • Added “State Delta Subscriptions” for pub/sub feature
  • Added Supply Chain Transaction Family
  • Providing Hyperledger Sawtooth features for Open Music Initiative Summer Lab.
  • Completed Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative badge requirements.

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

 

WTF?! (What’s a Transaction Family?!)

By | Blog, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As a maintainer of Hyperledger Sawtooth, I’ve been getting that question frequently to the point it’s a meme for me.

I thought it would be helpful to walk through the definition of a transaction family for anyone who may also be wondering what it is or who may just be getting started working with Hyperledger technologies.

As quick background, Hyperledger Sawtooth is an enterprise solution for building, deploying, and running distributed ledgers (also called blockchains). It provides an extremely modular platform for implementing transaction-based updates to shared state (data) between untrusted parties.

That last part is important because without special abilities to handle multiple companies changing the same database, Sawtooth, or any other blockchain, would be pretty useless. Simply put, a Transaction Family is a group of operations or transaction types that you allow on your ledger. It’s an “Economy of Mechanism” (KISS if you prefer) approach to transaction APIs. Some networks will want fully programmable smart contracts. In that case you would use our EVM transaction family we have created with Hyperledger Burrow.

Other networks will instead require fixed transaction semantics to limit certain risks. In that case you will use families of transactions that offer just those operations. A simple example is the Integer Key family which provides just 3 operations (increment, decrement, and set). With just 3 operations and no looping constructs it’s very hard to have intentional or accidental transaction script problems.

A sophisticated example that still precludes arbitrary syntax is the bond trading family in our 0.7 branch. The semantics of that family include about 17 operations necessary to trade bonds and no extraneous operations that could be intentionally or unintentionally misused.

The motivation behind Transaction Families is to allow businesses to pick the level of versatility/risk that’s right for their network.

There’s a lot of other interesting characteristics of Transaction Families that have been built into the coming Hyperledger Sawtooth 1.0…

  • they can be written in almost any language
  • they run in separate processes for parallel compute and easier upgradeability
  • there is even a Settings transaction family intrinsic to Sawtooth to enforce configuration agreement on settings that impact all nodes (like interblock time).

If you’re interested, you can learn more about Hyperledger Sawtooth and see real world examples of how the technology is being used. You can also read the documentation, join the community on RocketChat or pull the code from GitHub to kick the tires today.

Meet the Hyperledger Interns!

By | Blog, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Back in March we announced Hyperledger’s inaugural summer internship program. We put together several internship projects that span across our incubated projects (Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Fabric and Hyperledger Sawtooth) proposed by active developers in the technical community.

Today, we’d like to introduce each intern, provide info on what they will be working on and get to know them a bit better. We asked each intern a few questions like what issue or problem they hope blockchain can solve and where they hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in five years.

Let’s see what they had to say!

S A Haridhakshini

S A Haridhakshini, BITS PilaniI, Hyderabad

An undergrad student at BITS PilaniI, Hyderabad, India pursuing Computer Science and Mathematics.
Hyperledger Intern Project: Preserving Privacy with Hyperledger Sawtooth

1. What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Bitcoin and blockchain technologies are totally dynamic and mesmerising areas of today’s technology driven world. Nothing else I’ve encountered in my education so far has excited me as much as blockchain or its related fields.

We are aware that bank institutions are still vulnerable to tried and trusted methods of sophisticated cybercrime. I really hope blockchain technologies when applied to the areas of crime and cyber-theft will ease the process for cyber crime officials to a very great extent. Blockchain which is a distributed ledger system when applied to the banking systems worldwide could deliver much better cybersecurity. Eventually, cyber-theft will be erased from the lists of crimes and online transactions will be immune from malicious participants. I strongly believe that these concepts will leave an imprint of dynamic transformation and legacy of its own on mankind.

2. Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in five years?

It is true that the Hyperledger community is one of the most renowned open source projects in the world and it has exemplary researchers and developers working hard everyday to build and engineer systems that would stand the test of time. Five years down the line, I believe there will be more efficient solutions for the present day difficulties in blockchain which includes scalability issues, instant payments, low cost for micropayments and many more. I envision that the Hyperledger community along with its blockchain projects will act as a ground for the future’s globalization and economic factors. It will revolutionize the social and technological trends to a great extent.


Attila Klenik

Attila Klenik, Budapest University of Technology and Economic

A PhD student at Budapest University of Technology and Economic studying performance model identification and optimization of blockchain systems

Hyperledger Intern Project: Contract-Based Business Process Execution

1. What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Blockchain (and related frameworks, like Hyperledger Fabric) can serve as a firm foundation for critical applications in nearly all domains. Being a distributed, highly available, synchronization medium, developers can satisfy many requirements of critical systems using a single middleware, not to mention the additional security provided by blockchain.

2. Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in five years?

In my honest opinion, in five years Hyperledger Fabric and blockchain will be just as supported by Business Process Modeling as traditional technologies nowadays. Mature toolchains will support the high-level design of blockchain-based systems. Technically and legally certified domain specific templates for smart contracts and pattern libraries for process design will elevate the trust at the technical level to that of the business. Furthermore, “blockchainification” i.e. using the Blockchain technology as a substitute for sequential inter party communication in consolidating and re engineering existing applications will be as common, as it was/is with the cloud. I believe blockchain will be a dominant technology, especially in the business process domain.


Ezequiel Gomez

Ezequiel Gomez, Boston University

An international undergraduate student from Mexico studying at Boston University

Hyperledger Intern Project: Anonymous Transactions in Hyperledger Iroha

1. What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Growing up in Latin America where financial institutions and governments are known to be very corrupt, the transparency of blockchains immediately caught my eye. Every year the amount of money sent to Mexico in the form of remittances increases, reaching an all-time high of 26,987 million dollars in 2016. As money flows in, a lot of this money is being kept by intermediary financial institutions or service providers that keep a percentage of this money and take a long time processing these payments. Remittances rank third in the sources of foreign exchange coming into Mexico, and around 43% of the 26,970 million dollars sent every year is being sent through intermediaries other than banks. These intermediaries charge workers 3-4% of the money being sent back to Mexico, but since the exchange rate from USD to MXN Pesos must also be taken into account, the families are only receiving around 83% of the money initially sent. Given that the monthly average transfer is around $300USD, a 17% increase would give the average receiving family $50 extra dollars every month. I hope that blockchain solutions can lower the transaction fees so that the Mexican workers are better rewarded for the sacrifices of being an immigrant. Given that blockchain transactions require no intermediary and have transaction fees much lower than 17% of the money being transferred they are already fit to solve this problem. However, we need to create blockchain solutions that make this technology more accessible to the average person.

2. Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in five years?

I hope to see Blockchain providing businesses new solutions, allowing them to incorporate new business models and businesses trusting this new technology when searching for new solutions. Hyperledger provides businesses with properly architected blockchain and distributed ledger solutions, which can be implemented into incorporate new business models and solutions that would make industries more efficient. As more companies join Hyperledger, the amount of developers actively contributing to Hyperledger will grow as well. Within the next five years the distributed ledgers built by Hyperledger projects will be used to provide businesses with new solutions and opportunities, and the expanding community of developers will work hand in hand with business leaders to make sure there is a codebase that can fit their needs. A recent report on the current state of blockchains done by McKinsey found more than 60 use cases for blockchains after surveying 200 companies from different industries, and predict that based on the current rate of evolution, blockchain solutions will reach their full potential in the next 5 years. McKinsey identified seven use cases for blockchains which could generate 80-100 billion dollars in impact. Given the amount of innovation that blockchains will bring to the table in business solutions, I am excited to be part of this revolution with the future leaders of blockchain solutions.

References:

http://eleconomista.com.mx/finanzas-publicas/2017/02/05/11-datos-sobre-envio-remesas-mexico

http://www.nexos.com.mx/?p=9109


Indirajith Vijai Ananth

Indirajith Vijai Ananth, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy

A Ph.D. student at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy studying Data Security and Privacy
Hyperledger Intern Project: Design and Implement Blockchain Clustering Platform for Hyperledger

1. What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Blockchain can provide open standard distributed ledger technology, which will provide more open and provisioned/controlled database of moving/transferring objects. One should not need to keep a separate record of objects and their state. Stakeholders can have their relative info at any stage of a transaction or lifecycle of an object or asset.

It is also more secure so, each stakeholder can be able to keep a record for them and contribute to the distributed structure to strengthen it.

2. Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in five years?

In five years down the line, I think blockchain will be the backbone network of several mobile applications, the core of supply chain industries, logistics and even will be a mandatory tool or technological solution of several governmental records keeping departments. With the help of Hyperledger, anyone can have their own blockchain which can be tweaked to custom built to address one’s own problem.


Nikhil Chawla

Nikhil Chawla, Northern India Engineering

An undergrad student at the Northern India Engineering pursuing a Computer Science and Engineering degree

Hyperledger Intern Project: Deploy Fabric on Kubernetes Using Hyperledger Cello

1. What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

Blockchains are generally considered in technical grounds with Bitcoins (Cryptocurrency), where transaction of bitcoins is shared between the authorized parties and a ledger of those transactions is maintained among those authorized parties only. But, one of the diverse uses of blockchain I think is in healthcare where a patient has the freedom to share is medical history and other medication details, with the doctors he would want to share everything. Now, consider a scenario where a patient is being treated by multiple doctors at the same time, then, how easy it will be for the doctors to check the medical history in form of transactions of the patient. And suppose if one doctor makes an addition to his medication then it will be automatically updated in the ledger of other authorised doctors as well, and accordingly he can also make changes if needed. This is one of the significant aspect of blockchains (Hyperledger), as modernization is affecting the life force of humans, so it should be made as easy as possible for the humans to maintain their health in a modern era. Apparently, on the same concept of “Healthcare”, I along with some colleagues initiated a project named “Medcare” which was focused on a centralized system for maintaining patient’s health record and patient would authorize the doctors of his choice to have a look on his/her medical records. Unfortunately, we couldn’t give it a push due to lack of resources and time, but I assume blockchains can make it happen in a resourceful way.

2. Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in five years?

Blockchain is a growing technology which has the potential to affect industries like, Finance, Healthcare, Software Testing and many more. Blockchains can be used to eliminate the need of 3rd-party ledger which is currently a part of online transaction system, like, while using Paytm for mobile recharge, a 3rd party ledger is being maintained by Paytm itself for your transaction, although the transaction occurred between you and your connection provider (Airtel,Vodafone etc.). I think ideally these whole transactions must be maintained between two parties only because 3rd party ledger are a kind of vulnerability which might cause a breach in security. In Healthcare , Blockchains can bring a whole new world which is a tightly coupled secure network, where privacy of patient records can be maintained easily and at the same time it is easily accessible from anywhere, anytime, if the person has the access using a signed digital contract or something like this. In software testing, It can help to solve some unsolvable problems such as Byzantine  fault  tolerance , Two Generals Problem and so on which are currently unsolvable with a proof. To understand this better, assume a situation, where a distributed database is being maintained using blockchains, if one transaction is occurred in these two connected nodes , and one of them fails and crashes down, then, the other connected node can help us to rectify the problem and can help to avoid this situation to occur in future. Now, as the time will pass, certain new areas will also be discovered where blockchain would act as a elixir and Hyperledger being a widely renowned project which aims to develop resourceful blockchain network. It will be the only best option and Hyperledger will be equipped with all possible working technologies of that time. For example, currently it is being added with “Kubernetes Support for Fabric”.

Please help us in welcoming all our interns! It is our hope that they continue to be valued contributors in the Hyperledger community well after their summer internships. You might even want to join them working on the Hyperledger projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

 

 

 

Consensus 2017 is a Wrap!

By | Events, Finance, Healthcare, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

The Hyperledger team (and 40 of our members!) spent a good amount of time in New York for CoinDesk’s annual Consensus conference last week. It was a great event with tons of excitement and enthusiasm around blockchain and its many applications. Attendees were from all walks of life – from developers to architects to financial services professionals to healthcare specialists to investors – all trying to better understand the best and most practical use cases of the technology.
The event kicked off the weekend before with the Building Blocks Hackathon at 30 Rockefeller where many of the world’s top blockchain developers vied to build the next killer smart contract app. Participants could build on top of any blockchain protocol: bitcoin, Ethereum, Hyperledger or otherwise. And through various sponsor challenges, they were encouraged to leverage the software and support made available by our world-class mentors in order to deliver projects.

Hyperledger was a sponsor of the event. The Hashed Health development team ended up winning the Hyperledger challenge, which was to create a game using any of the Hyperledger frameworks

(Winning team of the Hyperledger hackathon challenge and Hyperledger Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf)

Jonathan Levi, an active Hyperledger community member and the founder of HACERA, won 2 hackathon challenges using Hyperledger technology. They won the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance challenge and they were one of the winners of the Microsoft challenge. They called their solution Dutchess – a secure decentralized Chess on the blockchain that allows players to use ETH to pay for an unfair advantage in a sealed-bid Dutch auction. The entry highlighted Jonathan’s and HACERA’s approach of integrating multiple permissioned & public chains.

Dutchess incorporated:

  • Public Ethereum accounts used to transfer money to a sealed-bid Dutch auction
  • Confidential transactions using Solidity on Quorum, deployed on Microsoft Azure
  • A permissioned and public identity chain (Sovrin) for registering identity tokens
  • Hyperledger Indy for implementing secure verifiable claims
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth for transaction processing and validation

The result was a mini HACERA-like workflow that provided secure, auditable, privacy preserving, that prevents impersonation, relying on self-sovereign identity and offers a non-repudiation guarantee – with a playable fun game of Chess on a blockchain.

Early Monday, the Hyperledger team then set up shop on the 6th floor of the Marriott Marquis in Times Square. Crowds of attendees stopped by each day to learn more about the technology.  

 

At the booth several member companies gave demos on different Hyperledger projects including Hyperledger Fabric and Hyperledger Iroha. Cloudsoft demonstrated Deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes with Cloudsoft AMP. IBM showed Connect a Cloud, connecting organizations together on Hyperledger Fabric using hosted cloud providers of choice. Soramitsu ran a KYC/user identity demo of Hyperledger Iroha/Android app and video, and Byacco, a local digital currency currently in use at University of Aizu in Fukushima, Japan. IntellectEU together with their customer Telindus (Proximus Group) explained streamlined asset transactions through reconciliation, matching and resolution among multiple parties.

Hyperledger also hosted a Roundtable on Monday on its distributed ledger technologies, Hyperledger Sawtooth and Hyperledger Iroha, each technology had end users speak to their different use cases. Kelly Olsen from Intel spoke to Sawtooth and his user, Pokitdok CTO, Ted Tanner weighed in on how they are utilizing Sawtooth in their healthcare blockchain solution. Makoto Takemiya, CEO, co-founder, Soramitsu discussed Hyperledger Iroha as a blockchain framework for mobile applications and Soichiro Takagi, from the Center for Global Communications (GLOCOM), International University of Japan shared his experience with the technology.

(Hyperledger roundtable participants: Makoto Takemiya, Soichiro Takagi, Kelly Olsen & Ted Tanner)

In addition to the robust line-up of Hyperledger activities in the main Consensus program and on the show floor, Hyperledger hosted a series of talks that ran all day Monday and Tuesday in the Hyperledger Mini Summit room. Attendees interested in how to best collaborate and get involved in the Hyperledger initiatives and learn where they can provide the most value had their bases covered in Monday’s “Meet the Hyperledger community” sessions. Speakers included the new technical staff, and diverse representation from the Technical Steering and Marketing committees, Governing Board, Identity Working Group and our fearless leader, Brian Behlendorf, Hyperledger’s executive director.

In Tuesday’s Hyperledger Mini Summit sessions, members dove a bit deeper into the impact of blockchain technologies on their businesses with field reports on how they are using Hyperledger to solve their business objectives. Attendees heard technical insights from Norbloc on the KYC process, IntellectEU together with their customer Telindus (Proximus Group) on streamlined asset transactions, as well as Cloudsoft on deploying and managing global blockchain networks.

Our members reinforced that blockchain is not only impacting business on a global scale, but also across industries through blockchain talks from Huawei on telecom, Daimler on the industrial enterprise, Deloitte on regulation, Energy Blockchain Labs on reversing China carbon emissions, and a panel of speakers from Accenture, BanQu and Leading Directions on blockchain for good applications.

Hyperledger hosted three different panels on Tuesday moderated by Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf and Security Maven, Dave Huseby. Those panels were “The Role of Open Source in Blockchain,” “Blockchain in the Wild, PoCs, Pilots & Deployments” and “Security, Privacy and the Enterprise Blockchain.”

(The Role of Open Source in Blockchain panelists: Dan Middleton, Intel, Casey Kuhlman, Monax, Makoto Takemiya, Soramitsu & Amber Baldet, J.P. Morgan)

 

(Blockchain in the Wild, PoCs, Pilots & Deployments panelists: Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo, Ashwin Kumar, Deutsche Boerse, Ram Komarraju, CLS Group, Corey Todaro, Hashed Health & David Treat, Accenture)

The panels were very well attended and there was great discussion on all three topics. It was most interesting that identity on the blockchain turned out to be the main topic of conversation during the security and privacy panel. And on that note, we’re excited with Hyperledger Indy just recently getting accepted into incubation under Hyperledger. Indy provides tools, libraries, and reusable components for providing digital identities rooted on blockchains.

(Security, Privacy and the Enterprise Blockchain panelists: Justin Newton, Netki, Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation, Jeff Garzik, Bloq & Astyanax Kanakakis, Norbloc)

We ended Consensus with a member party atop a NYC hotel rooftop. It was such a pleasure to see everyone and we are extremely grateful for all the support our community has provided around this event and overall. We’re looking forward to next year’s event – we hope that you can join us!
For those interested in additional information about Hyperledger technologies please reach out to: info@hyperledger.org. As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts via GitHub, Rocket.Chat the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are May updates on Hyperledger projects.

Hyperledger Explorer

  • We are currently understanding the Node SDK provided by Hyperledger Fabric
  • Created basic project setup with front end using popular react.js framework
  • Added two new developers and are busy getting them up to speed on contributing to Hyperledger Explorer

Hyperledger Burrow

  • We moved and renamed former eris-db v0.16 into Hyperledger Burrow v0.16 (logistics) to initiate Hyperledger Burrow
    • We upgraded Tendermint v0.8.0 (Burrow v0.16) to Tendermint v0.9.2 (on develop Burrow v0.17)
    • Initial design work completed on user interaction with Hyperledger Burrow’s EVM from within Hyperledger family, specifically looking at Hyperledger Composer for UI/UX (replacing monax/legacy-contracts.js) and Hyperledger Indy for identity
  • Started collaboration with Hyperledger Sawtooth to use Hyperledger Burrow’s EVM as a transaction processor on the Hyperledger Sawtooth platform

Hyperledger Cello

  • Added new user-dashboard to support multi-tenant
  • K8s support has been discussed and will make documentation on jira
  • Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 support script are submitted
  • Summer intern students were trained to get familiar with the project

Hyperledger Composer

  • Made great progress with our move to Hyperledger:
    • Moved all source code and builds into GitHub and Travis CI under the Hyperledger organization
    • Moved the main website and documentation to https://hyperledger.github.io/composer
    • Substantial rebranding effort of main website, documentation, and playground
  • Delivered support for deploying Hyperledger Composer to Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 alpha:
    • New version of the getting started guide and related documentation
    • Continuing to keep in step with the latest Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 changes
  • Delivered connection profile and identity management support in the playground:
    • Use connection profiles to connect to Hyperledger Fabric v0.6 and v1.0.
    • Use identity management to switch between different Blockchain identities.
    • Removed and deprecated the old, superseded UI
  • Upgraded the Angular generator to generate Angular 4 applications.
  • Began work on being able to model, publish, and subscribe to business events.

Hyperledger Fabric

  • We agreed to a feature/code freeze at the Hackfest in DC, and selected co-release managers for the v1.0 release: Chris Ferris (IBM) and Jonathan Levi (Hacera).
  • At the hackfest, we also discussed and agreed on some changes to the development process proposed by Dave Huseby, which we will implement as a function of creating the release branch for v1.0.0-alpha2.
  • The TL;DR: of the proposal is that we will manage change through feature branches that will be merged into a development branch to undergo the full gauntlet of testing, and reverted if they still need work. Once the development branch has merged the set of features agreed for a release, the develop branch will be fast forward merged into the release branch (also the master branch), tested once more, and then published. The release/master branch which will always have the most recent stable release as the default on GitHub (as opposed to the head of development as is the case today).
  • Hyperledger Fabric added three new maintainers to help keep reviews up with the pace of change requests.
  • The rate of bug fixing has consistently outpaced reporting for the past 3 weeks, with in excess of 50 defects resolved per week.
  • The unit test coverage has seen steady improvement, now more than 70% (it had been 61%) with many key areas of the code at 100%. The integration test framework is taking shape and we expect to have regular testing (daily, performance/scale and long running) operational shortly.
  • Maintainers cut a v1.0.0-alpha2 release the week of May 8

Hyperledger Indy

  • Hyperledger Indy team is currently planning Jira migration from Sovrin to Hyperledger and working on configuration post-Jira Upgrade
  • Planning migration of code from Sovrin GitHub to Hyperledger GitHub
  • The team is identifying participants for Healthcare, Performance and Scaling WGs as well as collaborators for Hyperledger Burrow and Hyperledger Composer

Hyperledger Iroha

Hyperledger Sawtooth

  • Hyperledger Sawtooth graduated to Active status, announced at Consensus
  • Good hacking at the DC Hackfest, getting started integrating the Hyperledger Burrow EVM and Hyperledger Sawtooth.
  • On track for 0.8 feature complete (one condition for 1.0 release this summer).
    • Updated PoET to Hyperledger Sawtooth 0.8 architecture
    • Implemented PoET Z, C, & K admission policies
    • Threaded peering code
    • Added docker compose features and docs
    • Automated binary package and docker images
    • Improved serial scheduler to take advantage of new context manager functionality
    • Implemented client-side Javascript SDK (Transaction/Batch creation)
    • Implemented Go SDK
    • C++ SDK in progress

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

 

(5.24.17) Bitcoin Magazine: Hyperledger Moves Blockchain Frameworks Sawtooth and Iroha Forward, Adds Members

By | Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth, News

Hyperledger, the open-source, cross-industry collaborative effort focusing on blockchain technology, has advanced the status of its Sawtooth and Iroha blockchain frameworks from “Incubation” to “Active” status.

The green light was given by Hyperledger’s 12-member Technical Steering Committee (TSC), chaired by Christopher Ferris, CTO of Open Technology at IBM. It followed an extensive review period during which each project was evaluated based on exit criteria that include legal compliance, community support, test coverage and continuous integration support, documentation, code reviews and more.

More here.

(5.22.17) CoinDesk: Healthcare IT Firm Joins Hyperledger Blockchain Project, Codebases Activated

By | Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth, News

The Linux-led Hyperledger project today took several new steps toward its goal of creating enterprise-grade blockchain solutions for enterprise.

The consortium was joined by its first US healthcare IT firm, Change Healthcare, and graduated two of its code bases, Intel’s Sawtooth Lake and blockchain startup Soramitsu’s Iroha, into active status.

More here.

Hyperledger Sawtooth Graduates to Active Status

By | Blog, Hyperledger Sawtooth

We’re happy to share that Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has granted the Hyperledger Sawtooth maintainer’s request to advance the project’s status from Incubation to Active. Hyperledger Iroha also graduated today.

In growing to active Sawtooth has expanded from it’s initial contributors to a wide community with contributions from companies such as Intel, bitwise.io, Huawei, Monax, R3, Red Hat, Context Labs, Hacera, Capital One, PokitDok, dotBlockchain Music Inc., and IBM as well as many independent contributors.

The TSC members agree that the project has satisfied all of the Incubation Exit Criteria. Incubated projects are evaluated by specific exit criteria including legal compliance, community support, test coverage and continuous integration support, documentation, architectural alignment, published releases, and infrastructure support for such things as requirements and defect tracking, code reviews, continuous integration testing and more.

Hyperledger Sawtooth was accepted under incubation in April 2016. The framework was designed to explore scalability, security, and privacy questions prompted by the original distributed ledgers. It currently focuses on (1) designing enterprise deployments that don’t lose the distributed systems benefits of blockchains and (2) making smart contracts safe and confidential.. PoET, the new consensus hits scalability, while Transaction Families, the contract logic, narrow the attack surface for contracts while simultaneously broadening the functionality.

Hyperledger incubates and promotes a range of business blockchain technologies, including distributed ledger frameworks, smart contract engines, client libraries, graphical interfaces, utility libraries and sample applications. The Hyperledger umbrella strategy encourages the re-use of common building blocks and enables rapid innovation of DLT components. Hyperledger Sawtooth falls under that umbrella and is the third of eight Incubator projects to graduate.

As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts on Sawtooth as well as other projects, via github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Visualization of Hyperledger Sawtooth and Hyperledger Fabric Commit History

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Sawtooth

So much work is being done every day by the technical community to improve Hyperledger’s projects. We thought it be interesting to visualize the software development based on the commit history in git. Below, you’ll find videos of two of Hyperledger’s framework projects: Sawtooth and Fabric.

Starting with Hyperledger Sawtooth, you can see the project evolve during the 2016 POCs. As we reach fall we are able to open source a lot of that POC code and you see an explosion of new code around September.

Through these usage trials we learned what of the initial design was sound and what needed changes. During early winter you see the new design get built out. Once that matured around January you see where we removed the legacy code from the master branch and a chunk of the tree vanishes. This is the point where App / Dapp developers started using the new Sawtooth 0.8 API.

We are now at a point of interface stability which is one of the key triggers for declaring a Sawtooth v1.0 release. SDKs are available for a variety of languages (go, c++, java, node, python,… ) using it. There are more things we want to do before declaring 1.0 but the API for writing business logic is substantially simplified.

As for Hyperledger Fabric, there are 23 companies and a bunch of individuals (27 without an affiliation in their email signature) represented and 130 developers in total that have contributed to Hyperledger Fabric thus far. Top companies by contribution are: IBM, State Street Bank, Digital Asset Holdings, IT People, Linux Foundation, DTCC, Hitachi, Wanda Group, Fujitsu, Hyperchain, and Huawei Technologies.

There’s been a huge amount of work delivering the architectural refactor since the Fabric v0.6 release last fall, including a new approach to consensus, chaincode lifecycle management, support for pluggable membership services providers, multi-channel support, a redesigned ledger, pluggable database support and so much more.

You might want to join the other engineers working on these or one of the other Hyperledger projects! You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.