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Hyperledger Indy

Hyperledger Gains 10 New Members

By | Announcements, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Growth in open blockchain consortium doubles over past year with more than 160 members

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – (September 26, 2017) Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, announced today that 10 new organizations have joined the project. As a multi-project, multi-stakeholder effort, Hyperledger incubates eight business blockchain and distributed ledger technologies including Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Sawtooth, among others.

“The immense growth we’ve seen this year signifies an acceptance and understanding of Hyperledger blockchain solutions for business,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “These new diverse members have agreed to contribute their leadership and energy to the Hyperledger community. We thank them for their support and validation as we drive towards more PoCs, pilots and production uses cases of Hyperledger technologies in the enterprise.”

Hyperledger aims to enable organizations to build robust, industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support their individual business transactions by creating an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and code base. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, IoT, supply chain, manufacturing and technology. The latest General members include: AMIHAN, ChongQin Xichain Technologies, DLT Labs, GameCredits, Gibraltar Stock Exchange (GSX), Medicalchain and ScanTrust.

Hyperledger supports an open community that values contributions and participation from various entities. As such, pre-approved non-profits, open source projects and government entities can join Hyperledger at no cost as Associate members. Several Associate members joined this month including Mercy Corps, Taiwan Fintech Association and Zhejiang University.

New member quotes:

AMIHAN

“Amihan is proud to be the first Filipino company to join Hyperledger,” said Winston Damarillo, Chairman of Amihan Global Strategies. “We believe that blockchain and smart contracts are the key to preparing Southeast Asia for the digital age, and we are committed to working with the Hyperledger community to push the limits of blockchain technology. We look forward to working with our clients – some of the largest enterprises in ASEAN – to transform finance, healthcare, retail, and customer loyalty in one of the fastest-growing regions of the world.”

DLT Labs

“At DLT Labs, our corporate purpose is to create, integrate, and support dynamic distributed ledger solutions that equip our clients with the tools to capitalize on unrealized potential within their businesses,” said Loudon Owen, Chairman and CEO of DLT Labs. “With over 30 dedicated in-house Blockchain developers and over 20 proprietary enterprise products, DLT Labs has formed globe-spanning partnerships with leading edge consultancies, manufacturers, financial institution and innovative service providers. Our global presence spans the United States, the United Kingdom, China, India, Canada and Singapore. DLT is excited at the opportunity to join Hyperledger’s nexus of leaders, creators, and dreamers, and looks forward to forming long-lasting relationships with the forefront of blockchain innovators.”

GameCredits

“We are excited to join the company of industry leaders in Hyperledger,” said Alex Migitko, COO, GameCredits. “GameCredits is focused on a unique blockchain use case, catering to the $100 billion gaming industry and its massive audience of almost every third person on earth, governed by complex relations between various stakeholders. Our solutions will be of immense interest to adjacent industries and we believe we will be able to make a unique contribution to the alliance.”

Gibraltar Stock Exchange (GSX)

“We are today at the beginning of the blockchain revolution, witnessing in real time an explosion of ideas, experiments and projects that aim to completely redesign global capital markets for the new era,” said Nick Cowan, CEO, Gibraltar Stock Exchange. “The Gibraltar Stock Exchange’s membership in Hyperledger provides us with an exciting opportunity to connect, share ideas and collaborate with like minded innovators and industry leaders, without boundaries, with the aim of building consensus for the new global framework.”

Medicalchain

“Medicalchain puts health records back into the hands of patients, and that’s not possible without the secure storage and transfer of data. Using Hyperledger, Medicalchain will allow patients to control permissions to their health records – who gets access to them, what information they get access to and for how long,” said Dr. Albeyatti, co-founder of Medicalchain. “We are thrilled to join the Hyperledger community and will continue working to bring blockchain technology to the healthcare industry.”

ScanTrust

“Today’s connected consumers are demanding more transparency and with global supply chains becoming more complex, achieving this a challenging task,” said Nathan Anderson, CEO and Co-Founder, ScanTrust. “ScanTrust secure identifiers connect physical goods to the internet for enhanced supply chain security; by adding open blockchain technology to this foundation, brands will be able to protect and track their products using mobile phone authentication. We look forward to collaborating with the Hyperledger community to develop a scalable, enterprise-grade blockchain framework.”

To see a full list of member companies, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/members. If you’re interested in joining Hyperledger as a member company, please visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/join

About Hyperledger

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and Technology. The Linux Foundation hosts Hyperledger under the foundation. To learn more, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/.

 

 

DLT in Decentralized Identity

By | Blog, Hyperledger Indy

Guest post: Dr. Phil Windley, Sovrin Foundation

Since the dawn of the World Wide Web, we’ve been fixated on the concept of place. The entire language of the Web is about location: we visit Web sites using Web addresses. Consequently, it’s almost impossible for us to think there’s any other way. We build places where we expect people and machines (via APIs) to come, meet, and transact. The place metaphor leads to centralization. Facebook, Google, and Amazon are all places. The interactions on them are centralized and under the control of whoever owns the place.

Another way to think about online interaction is in terms of methods—ways of executing actions . Methods for interaction are called protocols. The Internet, domain name resolution, and email are familiar examples of systems based on protocols. Protocols define ways or methods for things to interact. They give the interaction a script, as it were, defining how an interaction plays out. “If you do X, then I’ll do Y.” “If you do X and then do Z, that’s an error.” and so on.

Protocols foster decentralization. By describing the method for interaction, a protocol gives anyone a way to participate. In addition, protocols naturally support interoperability and substitutability. Protocols are largely responsible for what Doc Searls and Dave Weinberger call the three virtues of the Internet:

  • Nobody owns it
  • Everybody can use it
  • Anybody can improve it

This contrast between place and protocol is evident in online identity. We treat identity as if it were something linked to a place. Every online identity you have was given to you by someone else.

This simple fact makes every online identity completely different from identity in the physical world where you exist first, independently, as a sovereign human being. In the physical world, identity emerges from relationships. Over time, humans have developed interaction patterns around how we identify ourselves to each other. In other words, identity in the physical world is a protocol.

Online identity systems are rigid and can only be used in the way their designers allow because places are prescriptive. In contrast, an identity protocol is fluid and flexible, supporting use cases the protocol designer never imagined. As an example, a protocol for identity could give rise to decentralized apps that let anyone share rides in their car without the overhead of a Lyft or Uber because the identity system would let others vouch for the driver or the passenger, independently, using a universally recognized standard.

How can we move online identity from place to protocol? A protocol for online identity would define how identifiers work and how anyone can create, manage, and exchange attributes and claims for those identifiers. A protocol for identity must be private, secure, interoperable, and open to everyone. The result is an identity network.

A protocol for identity relies on the combination of three important standards: decentralized identifiers (DIDs), verifiable claims, and a ledger that is available to all.

Decentralized Identifiers—DIDs allow anyone to create identifiers for anything. Furthermore, they are standard and interoperable. DIDs link to public keys and service endpoints. And because DIDs are pairwise pseudonymous to prevent correlation and preserve privacy, people will have hundreds or thousands of DIDs representing all of the various digital relationships to which they’re a party. These relationships might be with organizations they do business with, friends they interact with, or things they own.

Verifiable Claims—verifiable claims allow trustworthy assertions to be made about anything that has an identifier. Like DIDs, claims are standard and interoperable. Furthermore, they’re based on strong cryptography to bind the claim issuer, the claim subject, and the claim itself. Verifiable claims are combined with zero knowledge proofs for minimal disclosure. For example, when I need to prove to the bank that I’m employed by BYU, I don’t give them the claim. Instead I generate a proof—an incontrovertible certification of some fact—from the claim. The proof discloses only the information the bank needs. All this is done cryptographically so that no party to the transaction has any doubt whether or not the information is correct.

A Distributed Ledger—the ledger links a DID to associated keys and endpoints in a way that’s publicly discoverable. The ledger records information about claims (although not the claims themselves or any other private data). The ledger also supports claim and key revocation. The ledger is foundation for identity transactions.

A protocol for identity allows for ad hoc, decentralized online interactions that follow the patterns humans have developed for establishing trust in the physical world. This promises to unleash countless new decentralized products and services that will transform how people interact online. Joel Monegro wrote in his post on Fat Protocols:

By replicating and storing user data across an open and decentralized network rather than individual applications controlling access to disparate silos of information, we reduce the barriers to entry for new players and create a more vibrant and competitive ecosystem of products and services on top.

Moving online identity from place to protocol creates an open and decentralized network that reduces barriers to entry for new products and services that rely on identity to establish trust.

ABCs of Open Governance

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Chaintool, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Today, most people understand the concept of Open Source – certainly we expect most readers of this blog understand it. View the code, use the code, copy the code, change the code, and, depending on the license, contribute back changes or not.

What many people don’t get, and something we here at Hyperledger and The Linux Foundation pride ourselves on doing well, is Open Governance.

The Linux Foundation, and all of our 60+ open source projects, are not-for-profits building the greatest shared R&D investment in history. Open Governance is central to this promise.

Open Governance means that technical decisions -– which features to add, how to add them and when, among others – for a given Open Source project or projects are made by a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants. It is as close to the ideal of pure technical meritocracy as one can get and we strive continuously to reach that ideal.

Hyperledger recently concluded the 2017-2018 Technical Steering Committee (TSC) election, and so we thought it an opportune time to explain the ABCs of Open Governance. Please note that this is one Open Governance implementation and clearly not the only way to do it, but rather one proven and effective way.

What does the Hyperledger TSC do?

The TSC charter spells out the group’s responsibilities.

The TL;DR is that the TSC is the ultimate authority on technical decisions. This includes which new projects are admitted to Hyperledger , which current projects graduate from Incubation to Active , and the rules by which each Hyperledger project will operate.

Participation in Hyperledger through becoming a Contributor and/or Maintainer is open to anyone.
Hyperledger Charter Section 4C

As a developer or maintainer, this translates into one thing: trust. You know how decisions will be made and the process by which people will be selected to make these decisions. Hyperledger is vendor-neutral and technical contributions are based on meritocracy. We will always remain immune to the commercial interests of any single company.

The TSC election process consists of three simple steps:

  1. Identification of eligible participants
  2. Nominations
  3. Voting

Who is really eligible to be on the TSC?

The charter spells out that the TSC voting members shall consist of eleven (11) elected Contributors or Maintainers chosen by the Active Contributors.

So, how do you determine an active contributor, you may ask? As part of the current election, every project maintainer and Working Group leader was asked to provide a list of all the people that have contributed to their work in the past year. In addition, a review of all code and other contributions was conducted.

This year, 424 active contributors were identified as eligible to participate in the TSC election process.

Bring It (your nomination that is)

The Linux Foundation maintains an expert staff with decades of combined experience managing the operations of large scale, Openly Governed Open Source projects.

For Hyperledger, the Sr. Program Manager Todd Benzies ensures the trains run on time.

Below is Todd’s email calling for TSC nominations:

This nominating process produced 32 candidates for the 11 TSC spots. These 32 come from 20 different organizations, across a spectrum of industries, from technology vendors to foundations to end users from a variety of industries. They include people who work at Hyperledger members and non-members and some are standing as individuals.

A policy whose importance is hard to overstate is that anyone elected to a seat on the TSC is elected as a person unbound to the company for which they presently work. Should any TSC member during their tenure leave an employer for another, this would have zero impact on their standing as member of the Hyperledger TSC.

Cast your vote

Here is Todd’s email sent to the same list announcing the nominees and opening voting.

The arrow highlights one of the things that we’ve learned along the way as a trick to the trade of running open governance well. The voting system has to be unquestionably secure and fair (something by now truly everyone can relate to…).

We use the Condorcet Internet Voting System to safeguard the privacy of this election and voting process. CIVS can only be accessed by authorized voters, who receive a unique URL tied to their email address. Voters rank a set of possible choices and individual voter rankings are combined into an anonymous overall ranking of the choices. One vote is allowed per IP address.

Results

This process yields a fairly and openly-elected technical decision making body pulled from the community that cares about Hyperledger. We know they care not because they said so, not because the company they work for has joined Hyperledger, but because they invested their time to make contributions to Hyperledger code bases. Or, as Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf says, “it’s a do -ocracy.”

Meet the New Hyperledger TSC (listed in alphabetical order)

Arnaud Le Hors
Baohua Yang
Binh Nguyen
Christopher Ferris
Dan Middleton
Greg Haskins
Hart Montgomery
Jonathan Levi (new)
Kelly Olson (new)
Mic Bowman
Nathan George (new)

If you’re interested in learning more about the Hyperledger TSC and its elected members, we’ll be kicking off a “Meet the TSC” blog series in the coming weeks. Be sure to look out for it!

You can plug into the community at github , Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list .

(7.11.17) Computerworld: Linux group pushes out production-ready blockchain collaboration software

By | Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Sawtooth, News

The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger announced today the availability of Fabric 1.0, a collaboration tool for building blockchain distributed ledger business networks  such as smart contract technology.

The Hyperledger project, a collaborative cross-industry effort created to advance blockchain technology, said the Hyperledger Fabric framework can be a foundation for developing blockchain applications, products or customized business solutions

More here.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are June updates on Hyperledger projects.

Hyperledger Burrow

  • Implementation of dynamic memory on the Ethereum Virtual Machine
  • New type-safe Application Binary Interface package for translating data to Ethereum contracts into packed Ethereum bytes for transaction formulation (logical requirement for Ethereum chain; but all package implementations thus far have been GPLv3 licensed, as such in tooling code not included in Burrow; this new package will be able to go into Hyperledger Burrow under Apache license)
  • Alpha of batching client for new API with high transaction throughput (> 400 tx/s)
  • Various bug fixes
  • First prototype of Burrow EVM to run as transaction processor on Hyperledger Sawtooth Ledger

Hyperledger Cello

  • A user dashboard was added to support seeing blockchain status and chaincodes.
  • The k8s support features was started with intern students; Upgrade swarm support to latest version (17.04).
  • Refine the installation scripts to support multi-os-distributions.
  • Fabric 1.0-* supported scripts was added.

Hyperledger Composer

  • We completed all rebranding activities as part of the move to Hyperledger – we moved to the Hyperledger Docker Hub organization, and renamed the Yeoman generator module.
  • We added support for modelling and publishing events from a transaction processor function, allowing client applications and existing systems to respond to events from a deployed business network.
  • We made extensive changes to our new user and getting started documentation, including reworked installation guides and tutorials which are available in the docs: https://hyperledger.github.io/composer/introduction/introduction.html
  • We delivered a set of nodes for Node-RED which allow developers to easily build outbound and inbound integration between a deployed business network and external system using IoT/MQTT, WebSockets, TCP, etc.
  • We added experimental support for invoking external HTTP APIs from within a transaction processor function, allowing external data such as share prices to be used within business logic.
  • We are currently focusing on delivering Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 beta support, complex query support (by exploiting CouchDB), and a new vehicle lifecycle demo that shows off the power of Composer.

Hyperledger Explorer

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Fabric

  • Hyperledger Fabric v1.0.0-beta was released, and the maintainers plan on weekly releases until we have a demonstrably stable release candidate. We hope to be able to release in late July if all goes well.
  • The project’s engineers have significantly increased test coverage (+82%) and reduced its open defect count (~130 -> 22) since the 1.0.0-alpha2 release. It has been encouraging to see the diversity of contributions. It the past month alone, we have had contributions from 73 individuals representing 12 companies (including IBM) and 12 unaffiliated individuals.
  • The project is seeing a steadily increasing stream of downloads of the milestone releases with global coverage (US, Brazil, China, India, UK, Germany, France, Croatia, Russia, Japan, Indonesia, Australia and even Pakistan). There is an abundance of interest in China, India and Japan, nearly rivaling the US.
  • The remaining focus is on improving the documentation, continuing to test and fix bugs, and complete the various license, crypto-export and security scans.

Hyperledger Indy

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Iroha

  • No major updates to report this month.

Hyperledger Sawtooth

  • Graduated to Active status! 
  • Project page new and improved, now with demo networks: https://www.hyperledger.org/projects/sawtooth
  • Collaborating with Hyperledger Burrow to integrate EVM with Sawtooth.
  • Added “State Delta Subscriptions” for pub/sub feature
  • Added Supply Chain Transaction Family
  • Providing Hyperledger Sawtooth features for Open Music Initiative Summer Lab.
  • Completed Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative badge requirements.

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

 

Consensus 2017 is a Wrap!

By | Events, Finance, Healthcare, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

The Hyperledger team (and 40 of our members!) spent a good amount of time in New York for CoinDesk’s annual Consensus conference last week. It was a great event with tons of excitement and enthusiasm around blockchain and its many applications. Attendees were from all walks of life – from developers to architects to financial services professionals to healthcare specialists to investors – all trying to better understand the best and most practical use cases of the technology.
The event kicked off the weekend before with the Building Blocks Hackathon at 30 Rockefeller where many of the world’s top blockchain developers vied to build the next killer smart contract app. Participants could build on top of any blockchain protocol: bitcoin, Ethereum, Hyperledger or otherwise. And through various sponsor challenges, they were encouraged to leverage the software and support made available by our world-class mentors in order to deliver projects.

Hyperledger was a sponsor of the event. The Hashed Health development team ended up winning the Hyperledger challenge, which was to create a game using any of the Hyperledger frameworks

(Winning team of the Hyperledger hackathon challenge and Hyperledger Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf)

Jonathan Levi, an active Hyperledger community member and the founder of HACERA, won 2 hackathon challenges using Hyperledger technology. They won the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance challenge and they were one of the winners of the Microsoft challenge. They called their solution Dutchess – a secure decentralized Chess on the blockchain that allows players to use ETH to pay for an unfair advantage in a sealed-bid Dutch auction. The entry highlighted Jonathan’s and HACERA’s approach of integrating multiple permissioned & public chains.

Dutchess incorporated:

  • Public Ethereum accounts used to transfer money to a sealed-bid Dutch auction
  • Confidential transactions using Solidity on Quorum, deployed on Microsoft Azure
  • A permissioned and public identity chain (Sovrin) for registering identity tokens
  • Hyperledger Indy for implementing secure verifiable claims
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth for transaction processing and validation

The result was a mini HACERA-like workflow that provided secure, auditable, privacy preserving, that prevents impersonation, relying on self-sovereign identity and offers a non-repudiation guarantee – with a playable fun game of Chess on a blockchain.

Early Monday, the Hyperledger team then set up shop on the 6th floor of the Marriott Marquis in Times Square. Crowds of attendees stopped by each day to learn more about the technology.  

 

At the booth several member companies gave demos on different Hyperledger projects including Hyperledger Fabric and Hyperledger Iroha. Cloudsoft demonstrated Deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes with Cloudsoft AMP. IBM showed Connect a Cloud, connecting organizations together on Hyperledger Fabric using hosted cloud providers of choice. Soramitsu ran a KYC/user identity demo of Hyperledger Iroha/Android app and video, and Byacco, a local digital currency currently in use at University of Aizu in Fukushima, Japan. IntellectEU together with their customer Telindus (Proximus Group) explained streamlined asset transactions through reconciliation, matching and resolution among multiple parties.

Hyperledger also hosted a Roundtable on Monday on its distributed ledger technologies, Hyperledger Sawtooth and Hyperledger Iroha, each technology had end users speak to their different use cases. Kelly Olsen from Intel spoke to Sawtooth and his user, Pokitdok CTO, Ted Tanner weighed in on how they are utilizing Sawtooth in their healthcare blockchain solution. Makoto Takemiya, CEO, co-founder, Soramitsu discussed Hyperledger Iroha as a blockchain framework for mobile applications and Soichiro Takagi, from the Center for Global Communications (GLOCOM), International University of Japan shared his experience with the technology.

(Hyperledger roundtable participants: Makoto Takemiya, Soichiro Takagi, Kelly Olsen & Ted Tanner)

In addition to the robust line-up of Hyperledger activities in the main Consensus program and on the show floor, Hyperledger hosted a series of talks that ran all day Monday and Tuesday in the Hyperledger Mini Summit room. Attendees interested in how to best collaborate and get involved in the Hyperledger initiatives and learn where they can provide the most value had their bases covered in Monday’s “Meet the Hyperledger community” sessions. Speakers included the new technical staff, and diverse representation from the Technical Steering and Marketing committees, Governing Board, Identity Working Group and our fearless leader, Brian Behlendorf, Hyperledger’s executive director.

In Tuesday’s Hyperledger Mini Summit sessions, members dove a bit deeper into the impact of blockchain technologies on their businesses with field reports on how they are using Hyperledger to solve their business objectives. Attendees heard technical insights from Norbloc on the KYC process, IntellectEU together with their customer Telindus (Proximus Group) on streamlined asset transactions, as well as Cloudsoft on deploying and managing global blockchain networks.

Our members reinforced that blockchain is not only impacting business on a global scale, but also across industries through blockchain talks from Huawei on telecom, Daimler on the industrial enterprise, Deloitte on regulation, Energy Blockchain Labs on reversing China carbon emissions, and a panel of speakers from Accenture, BanQu and Leading Directions on blockchain for good applications.

Hyperledger hosted three different panels on Tuesday moderated by Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf and Security Maven, Dave Huseby. Those panels were “The Role of Open Source in Blockchain,” “Blockchain in the Wild, PoCs, Pilots & Deployments” and “Security, Privacy and the Enterprise Blockchain.”

(The Role of Open Source in Blockchain panelists: Dan Middleton, Intel, Casey Kuhlman, Monax, Makoto Takemiya, Soramitsu & Amber Baldet, J.P. Morgan)

 

(Blockchain in the Wild, PoCs, Pilots & Deployments panelists: Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo, Ashwin Kumar, Deutsche Boerse, Ram Komarraju, CLS Group, Corey Todaro, Hashed Health & David Treat, Accenture)

The panels were very well attended and there was great discussion on all three topics. It was most interesting that identity on the blockchain turned out to be the main topic of conversation during the security and privacy panel. And on that note, we’re excited with Hyperledger Indy just recently getting accepted into incubation under Hyperledger. Indy provides tools, libraries, and reusable components for providing digital identities rooted on blockchains.

(Security, Privacy and the Enterprise Blockchain panelists: Justin Newton, Netki, Drummond Reed, Sovrin Foundation, Jeff Garzik, Bloq & Astyanax Kanakakis, Norbloc)

We ended Consensus with a member party atop a NYC hotel rooftop. It was such a pleasure to see everyone and we are extremely grateful for all the support our community has provided around this event and overall. We’re looking forward to next year’s event – we hope that you can join us!
For those interested in additional information about Hyperledger technologies please reach out to: info@hyperledger.org. As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts via GitHub, Rocket.Chat the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter.

Hyperledger’s Monthly Technical Update

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As our incubated projects continue to mature, we’d like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are May updates on Hyperledger projects.

Hyperledger Explorer

  • We are currently understanding the Node SDK provided by Hyperledger Fabric
  • Created basic project setup with front end using popular react.js framework
  • Added two new developers and are busy getting them up to speed on contributing to Hyperledger Explorer

Hyperledger Burrow

  • We moved and renamed former eris-db v0.16 into Hyperledger Burrow v0.16 (logistics) to initiate Hyperledger Burrow
    • We upgraded Tendermint v0.8.0 (Burrow v0.16) to Tendermint v0.9.2 (on develop Burrow v0.17)
    • Initial design work completed on user interaction with Hyperledger Burrow’s EVM from within Hyperledger family, specifically looking at Hyperledger Composer for UI/UX (replacing monax/legacy-contracts.js) and Hyperledger Indy for identity
  • Started collaboration with Hyperledger Sawtooth to use Hyperledger Burrow’s EVM as a transaction processor on the Hyperledger Sawtooth platform

Hyperledger Cello

  • Added new user-dashboard to support multi-tenant
  • K8s support has been discussed and will make documentation on jira
  • Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 support script are submitted
  • Summer intern students were trained to get familiar with the project

Hyperledger Composer

  • Made great progress with our move to Hyperledger:
    • Moved all source code and builds into GitHub and Travis CI under the Hyperledger organization
    • Moved the main website and documentation to https://hyperledger.github.io/composer
    • Substantial rebranding effort of main website, documentation, and playground
  • Delivered support for deploying Hyperledger Composer to Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 alpha:
    • New version of the getting started guide and related documentation
    • Continuing to keep in step with the latest Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 changes
  • Delivered connection profile and identity management support in the playground:
    • Use connection profiles to connect to Hyperledger Fabric v0.6 and v1.0.
    • Use identity management to switch between different Blockchain identities.
    • Removed and deprecated the old, superseded UI
  • Upgraded the Angular generator to generate Angular 4 applications.
  • Began work on being able to model, publish, and subscribe to business events.

Hyperledger Fabric

  • We agreed to a feature/code freeze at the Hackfest in DC, and selected co-release managers for the v1.0 release: Chris Ferris (IBM) and Jonathan Levi (Hacera).
  • At the hackfest, we also discussed and agreed on some changes to the development process proposed by Dave Huseby, which we will implement as a function of creating the release branch for v1.0.0-alpha2.
  • The TL;DR: of the proposal is that we will manage change through feature branches that will be merged into a development branch to undergo the full gauntlet of testing, and reverted if they still need work. Once the development branch has merged the set of features agreed for a release, the develop branch will be fast forward merged into the release branch (also the master branch), tested once more, and then published. The release/master branch which will always have the most recent stable release as the default on GitHub (as opposed to the head of development as is the case today).
  • Hyperledger Fabric added three new maintainers to help keep reviews up with the pace of change requests.
  • The rate of bug fixing has consistently outpaced reporting for the past 3 weeks, with in excess of 50 defects resolved per week.
  • The unit test coverage has seen steady improvement, now more than 70% (it had been 61%) with many key areas of the code at 100%. The integration test framework is taking shape and we expect to have regular testing (daily, performance/scale and long running) operational shortly.
  • Maintainers cut a v1.0.0-alpha2 release the week of May 8

Hyperledger Indy

  • Hyperledger Indy team is currently planning Jira migration from Sovrin to Hyperledger and working on configuration post-Jira Upgrade
  • Planning migration of code from Sovrin GitHub to Hyperledger GitHub
  • The team is identifying participants for Healthcare, Performance and Scaling WGs as well as collaborators for Hyperledger Burrow and Hyperledger Composer

Hyperledger Iroha

Hyperledger Sawtooth

  • Hyperledger Sawtooth graduated to Active status, announced at Consensus
  • Good hacking at the DC Hackfest, getting started integrating the Hyperledger Burrow EVM and Hyperledger Sawtooth.
  • On track for 0.8 feature complete (one condition for 1.0 release this summer).
    • Updated PoET to Hyperledger Sawtooth 0.8 architecture
    • Implemented PoET Z, C, & K admission policies
    • Threaded peering code
    • Added docker compose features and docs
    • Automated binary package and docker images
    • Improved serial scheduler to take advantage of new context manager functionality
    • Implemented client-side Javascript SDK (Transaction/Batch creation)
    • Implemented Go SDK
    • C++ SDK in progress

That’s it for the updates! We encourage developers to join our efforts on these projects. You can plug into the Hyperledger community at github, Rocket.Chat the wiki or our mailing list. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

Happy coding!

 

(5.10.17) CoinDesk: Why Project Indy is Using Hybrid DLT to Rethink Digital Identity

By | Hyperledger Indy, News

The single biggest challenge for digital identity systems has been to create counterparts to the secure physical identifiers we use today.

For instance, there has yet been no effective online equivalent to producing your driver’s license at the drug store. And while there are traditional identifiers most people are familiar with online (like the Facebook login), these systems raise key questions about the centralized registries trusted by consumers and the control they have on the systems that secure them.

More here.