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Hyperledger

Hyperledger Gains 10 New Members

By | Announcements, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Cello, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Explorer, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Growth in open blockchain consortium doubles over past year with more than 160 members

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – (September 26, 2017) Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, announced today that 10 new organizations have joined the project. As a multi-project, multi-stakeholder effort, Hyperledger incubates eight business blockchain and distributed ledger technologies including Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Indy, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Sawtooth, among others.

“The immense growth we’ve seen this year signifies an acceptance and understanding of Hyperledger blockchain solutions for business,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “These new diverse members have agreed to contribute their leadership and energy to the Hyperledger community. We thank them for their support and validation as we drive towards more PoCs, pilots and production uses cases of Hyperledger technologies in the enterprise.”

Hyperledger aims to enable organizations to build robust, industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support their individual business transactions by creating an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and code base. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, IoT, supply chain, manufacturing and technology. The latest General members include: AMIHAN, ChongQin Xichain Technologies, DLT Labs, GameCredits, Gibraltar Stock Exchange (GSX), Medicalchain and ScanTrust.

Hyperledger supports an open community that values contributions and participation from various entities. As such, pre-approved non-profits, open source projects and government entities can join Hyperledger at no cost as Associate members. Several Associate members joined this month including Mercy Corps, Taiwan Fintech Association and Zhejiang University.

New member quotes:

AMIHAN

“Amihan is proud to be the first Filipino company to join Hyperledger,” said Winston Damarillo, Chairman of Amihan Global Strategies. “We believe that blockchain and smart contracts are the key to preparing Southeast Asia for the digital age, and we are committed to working with the Hyperledger community to push the limits of blockchain technology. We look forward to working with our clients – some of the largest enterprises in ASEAN – to transform finance, healthcare, retail, and customer loyalty in one of the fastest-growing regions of the world.”

DLT Labs

“At DLT Labs, our corporate purpose is to create, integrate, and support dynamic distributed ledger solutions that equip our clients with the tools to capitalize on unrealized potential within their businesses,” said Loudon Owen, Chairman and CEO of DLT Labs. “With over 30 dedicated in-house Blockchain developers and over 20 proprietary enterprise products, DLT Labs has formed globe-spanning partnerships with leading edge consultancies, manufacturers, financial institution and innovative service providers. Our global presence spans the United States, the United Kingdom, China, India, Canada and Singapore. DLT is excited at the opportunity to join Hyperledger’s nexus of leaders, creators, and dreamers, and looks forward to forming long-lasting relationships with the forefront of blockchain innovators.”

GameCredits

“We are excited to join the company of industry leaders in Hyperledger,” said Alex Migitko, COO, GameCredits. “GameCredits is focused on a unique blockchain use case, catering to the $100 billion gaming industry and its massive audience of almost every third person on earth, governed by complex relations between various stakeholders. Our solutions will be of immense interest to adjacent industries and we believe we will be able to make a unique contribution to the alliance.”

Gibraltar Stock Exchange (GSX)

“We are today at the beginning of the blockchain revolution, witnessing in real time an explosion of ideas, experiments and projects that aim to completely redesign global capital markets for the new era,” said Nick Cowan, CEO, Gibraltar Stock Exchange. “The Gibraltar Stock Exchange’s membership in Hyperledger provides us with an exciting opportunity to connect, share ideas and collaborate with like minded innovators and industry leaders, without boundaries, with the aim of building consensus for the new global framework.”

Medicalchain

“Medicalchain puts health records back into the hands of patients, and that’s not possible without the secure storage and transfer of data. Using Hyperledger, Medicalchain will allow patients to control permissions to their health records – who gets access to them, what information they get access to and for how long,” said Dr. Albeyatti, co-founder of Medicalchain. “We are thrilled to join the Hyperledger community and will continue working to bring blockchain technology to the healthcare industry.”

ScanTrust

“Today’s connected consumers are demanding more transparency and with global supply chains becoming more complex, achieving this a challenging task,” said Nathan Anderson, CEO and Co-Founder, ScanTrust. “ScanTrust secure identifiers connect physical goods to the internet for enhanced supply chain security; by adding open blockchain technology to this foundation, brands will be able to protect and track their products using mobile phone authentication. We look forward to collaborating with the Hyperledger community to develop a scalable, enterprise-grade blockchain framework.”

To see a full list of member companies, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/members. If you’re interested in joining Hyperledger as a member company, please visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/about/join

About Hyperledger

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and Technology. The Linux Foundation hosts Hyperledger under the foundation. To learn more, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/.

 

 

DLT in Decentralized Identity

By | Blog, Hyperledger Indy

Guest post: Dr. Phil Windley, Sovrin Foundation

Since the dawn of the World Wide Web, we’ve been fixated on the concept of place. The entire language of the Web is about location: we visit Web sites using Web addresses. Consequently, it’s almost impossible for us to think there’s any other way. We build places where we expect people and machines (via APIs) to come, meet, and transact. The place metaphor leads to centralization. Facebook, Google, and Amazon are all places. The interactions on them are centralized and under the control of whoever owns the place.

Another way to think about online interaction is in terms of methods—ways of executing actions . Methods for interaction are called protocols. The Internet, domain name resolution, and email are familiar examples of systems based on protocols. Protocols define ways or methods for things to interact. They give the interaction a script, as it were, defining how an interaction plays out. “If you do X, then I’ll do Y.” “If you do X and then do Z, that’s an error.” and so on.

Protocols foster decentralization. By describing the method for interaction, a protocol gives anyone a way to participate. In addition, protocols naturally support interoperability and substitutability. Protocols are largely responsible for what Doc Searls and Dave Weinberger call the three virtues of the Internet:

  • Nobody owns it
  • Everybody can use it
  • Anybody can improve it

This contrast between place and protocol is evident in online identity. We treat identity as if it were something linked to a place. Every online identity you have was given to you by someone else.

This simple fact makes every online identity completely different from identity in the physical world where you exist first, independently, as a sovereign human being. In the physical world, identity emerges from relationships. Over time, humans have developed interaction patterns around how we identify ourselves to each other. In other words, identity in the physical world is a protocol.

Online identity systems are rigid and can only be used in the way their designers allow because places are prescriptive. In contrast, an identity protocol is fluid and flexible, supporting use cases the protocol designer never imagined. As an example, a protocol for identity could give rise to decentralized apps that let anyone share rides in their car without the overhead of a Lyft or Uber because the identity system would let others vouch for the driver or the passenger, independently, using a universally recognized standard.

How can we move online identity from place to protocol? A protocol for online identity would define how identifiers work and how anyone can create, manage, and exchange attributes and claims for those identifiers. A protocol for identity must be private, secure, interoperable, and open to everyone. The result is an identity network.

A protocol for identity relies on the combination of three important standards: decentralized identifiers (DIDs), verifiable claims, and a ledger that is available to all.

Decentralized Identifiers—DIDs allow anyone to create identifiers for anything. Furthermore, they are standard and interoperable. DIDs link to public keys and service endpoints. And because DIDs are pairwise pseudonymous to prevent correlation and preserve privacy, people will have hundreds or thousands of DIDs representing all of the various digital relationships to which they’re a party. These relationships might be with organizations they do business with, friends they interact with, or things they own.

Verifiable Claims—verifiable claims allow trustworthy assertions to be made about anything that has an identifier. Like DIDs, claims are standard and interoperable. Furthermore, they’re based on strong cryptography to bind the claim issuer, the claim subject, and the claim itself. Verifiable claims are combined with zero knowledge proofs for minimal disclosure. For example, when I need to prove to the bank that I’m employed by BYU, I don’t give them the claim. Instead I generate a proof—an incontrovertible certification of some fact—from the claim. The proof discloses only the information the bank needs. All this is done cryptographically so that no party to the transaction has any doubt whether or not the information is correct.

A Distributed Ledger—the ledger links a DID to associated keys and endpoints in a way that’s publicly discoverable. The ledger records information about claims (although not the claims themselves or any other private data). The ledger also supports claim and key revocation. The ledger is foundation for identity transactions.

A protocol for identity allows for ad hoc, decentralized online interactions that follow the patterns humans have developed for establishing trust in the physical world. This promises to unleash countless new decentralized products and services that will transform how people interact online. Joel Monegro wrote in his post on Fat Protocols:

By replicating and storing user data across an open and decentralized network rather than individual applications controlling access to disparate silos of information, we reduce the barriers to entry for new players and create a more vibrant and competitive ecosystem of products and services on top.

Moving online identity from place to protocol creates an open and decentralized network that reduces barriers to entry for new products and services that rely on identity to establish trust.

Meet the TSC: Kelly Olson, Intel

By | Blog, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Back to our blog series that focuses on the motivations and backgrounds of the individuals that make up Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC). As a reminder, the TSC is a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants and is a core element of Hyperledger’s Open Governance model. The TSC is responsible for all technical decisions – from which features to add, how to add them and when, among others.

Now let’s introduce our next Hyperledger TSC member, Kelly Olson from Intel. Let’s see what he had to say about Hyperledger, his role in the TSC and the community!

Describe your current role, background and why you wanted to be a part of the Hyperledger TSC?

My current role is as Director of Distributed Ledger Technology at Intel. Hyperledger is the leading organization in the open source development of blockchains for enterprise. I’m looking forward to advancing this cause and encouraging collaboration among the many Hyperledger projects.

Kelly Olson, Director of Distributed Ledger at Intel Corporation

How are you or your company currently using Hyperledger technologies or how do you plan to?

Intel is leveraging Hyperledger Sawtooth for a number of internal and external deployments.

What are the benefits of Hyperledger’s open governance model?

For technology to be trustworthy it is important that not only the source code be open source, but also the process by which it is managed. It is important that anyone can contribute to the process so that the best ideas can be used.

What’s the most important technical milestone for Hyperledger to reach by the end of 2017?

I’d like to see more projects mature to a 1.0 release in the remaining few months of 2017.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

The best way to understand the benefits blockchain provides, and how it can be used is to start experimenting. I’d recommend that anyone interested start with one of the getting started tutorials provided by most Hyperledger projects.

What’s the one thing you hope to accomplish by being a part of Hyperledger’s TSC?

I hope to ensure that software coming out of Hyperledger is secure and developed with best practices.

What’s a missing feature or spec that you hope Hyperledger can add in the soon future?

I think that interoperability and privacy are two elements that have yet to be solved in an adequate way for blockchain software. I’d like to see more collaboration between the projects with a goal of achieving some level of interoperability.

What’s the biggest struggle or challenge you see Hyperledger having to overcome?

I think we are in the very early stages of blockchain deployment. Today blockchains have limitations around privacy and scalability that need to be addressed before widespread adoption.

What use cases are you most excited about with Hyperledger and/or blockchain?

Blockchains provide a few unique capabilities not provided by traditional distributed databases. These include the ability for multiple organizations to securely share a common record in a more ‘democratic manner’ and they also provide strong guarantees around immutability. The best use cases I’ve seen leverage one, or both, of these properties.

 

[VIDEO] Hyperledger Interviews David Treat, Accenture

By | Blog

David Treat is the global lead for Accenture’s Distributed Ledger Blockchain Practice Financial Services. As a services company, Accenture is an integrator of capabilities and wants to bring the best of innovations to clients. Hyperledger is the perfect place for them to be connected with all facets of participants in the blockchain innovation space. David believes being at that heart allows Accenture to bring the best to their clients.

According to David, blockchain has huge potential to move the financial services industry away from messaged based models, slow reconciliation processes and inefficiency of fragmented data stores. With blockchain, financial services can move to a shared data construct, driving down costs, increasing efficiency and opening up entirely new business models.

Blockchain is going to change the way Accenture does business with clients as they think about the network effect and the ability to share data among participants. It changes the model and the entire dynamic for consulting – to not just think about serving a single client but multiple clients and the wider industry.

If you want to be at the heart, innovation and progress of blockchain, Hyperledger is the place to be. The best conversations are happening here. Accenture wants to take the power of this diverse community and bring something truly transformative to all industries, according to David.

Mentorship at Hyperledger: Four Interns Share Their Appreciation for Great Mentors

By | Blog, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Iroha, Hyperledger Sawtooth

If you read about the projects that Hyperledger’s summer interns have just completed, you’ll quickly see that these are serious internships that come with the prize of greater knowledge, skills, and connections with the technical community. One of the most important of these connections is the connection to a great mentor.

As part of our efforts to foster the development of blockchain talent globally, we pair each of our interns up with an expert to mentor and guide them. Here are all the ways that the mentors involved with Hyperledger’s 2017 summer internship program made a difference, in the words of our interns.

    • “My mentor, Baohua Yang from IBM, helped me in the project to understand and contribute.” — Indirajith Vijai Ananth
    • “My mentor, Jiang Feihu from Huawei Technologies, is one of the most supportive mentors I’ve come across to work with. Right from my selection for the internship, he started mentoring me and strategizing everything, although it was still a month difference from the official beginning of the internship. He’s a good mentor who helped me at every single difficulty that struck my way.” — Nikhil Chawla
    • My mentor was Makoto Takemiya from Soramitsu, and his mentorship helped me understand how Hyperledger Iroha and similar projects worked. We had meetings every week where progress on projects would be presented and where I would ask questions regarding details on Hyperledger Iroha and what the best way of achieving certain tasks would be. Makoto is a very skilled developer and he guided my research and development process to make sure everything was on track.” — Ezequiel Gomez
    • My mentor was László Gönczy from the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), and Quanopt Ltd. His profound knowledge in business process modeling was a continuous source of guidance and support for my work. Firstly, he helped me to select of the BPMN elements to be implemented in the experimental prototype. The BPMN has an extremely large variety of notions in its metamodel (the standard being hundreds of pages long), but the important elements commonly used in the industry form only a smaller subset. Secondly, he helped to refine my approach by providing common, yet complex use cases/sample models. The expert guidance of my mentor played a significant part in successfully completing the project. Our work enjoyed a huge benefit of the professional advices of Imre Kocsis (BME).” — Attila Klenik

Thank you to all of Hyperledger’s mentors for fostering new blockchain talent and ensuring a successful 2017 summer internship program!

(9.14.17) CoinDesk: Old Flames, New Code: Ripple and Hyperledger Reunite for Interledger Effort

By | News

Ripple and Hyperledger might soon get a chance to reignite an old flame.

Following an early promise by Ripple to contribute code to the Hyperledger blockchain consortium’s open-source repository, the two organizations parted ways over differing opinions on blockchain design. Whereas Hyperledger’s members largely focused on private blockchains that required permission to join, Ripple instead created hybrid technology featuring a cryptocurrency more reminiscent of a public blockchain.

More here.

(9.13.17) SiliconANGLE: Hyperledger Project strives to reboot thorny problems of the world

By | News

What if the cost of shipping a container halfway across the world could be reduced by 50 percent? Or patient records could be available immediately in any medical facility around the globe? Or every shipment of food could be tracked mile by mile to avoid spoilage? These are a few of the problems that the Hyperledger Project, an open-source initiative to build blockchain and related tools, is seeking to tackle by leveraging the growing power of new transaction-based technologies.

More here.

Meet the TSC: Arnaud Le Hors, IBM

By | Blog, Hyperledger Burrow, Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Sawtooth

As promised, we’re kicking off a new blog series that focuses on the motivations and backgrounds of the individuals that make up Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC).

The TSC is a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants and is a core element of Hyperledger’s Open Governance model. The model has worked for The Linux Foundation for 15+ years and therefore has been purposefully passed down to each open source project to offer an even playing field for all those involved – coming as close as possible to pure technical meritocracy as one can get. The TSC is responsible for all technical decisions – from which features to add, how to add them and when, among others.

With that background, let’s introduce Hyperledger TSC member, Arnaud Le Hors from IBM. Let’s see what he had to say about Hyperledger, his role in the TSC and the community!

Describe your current role, background and why you wanted to be a part of the Hyperledger TSC?

I’m Senior Technical Staff Member of Web & Blockchain Open Technologies at IBM. I’ve been working on open technologies for over 25 years, focusing on standards and open source development, both as a staff member of the X Consortium and W3C, and as a representative for IBM. I was editor of several key web specifications including HTML and DOM and was a pioneer of open source with the release of libXpm in 1990. I participated in several prominent open source projects including the X Window System and Xerces, the Apache XML parser. I currently am the main representative for IBM at W3C, an elected member of the Hyperledger Technical Steering Committee, and a contributor to Hyperledger Fabric.

My main goal is for Hyperledger to not merely be successful technically but be successful as a true Open Source project with an active, vibrant, and diverse community. There are too many projects out there that claim to be open source but fail to have an open governance. In my role on the TSC I will continue to strive to make this community truly open.

Arnaud Le Hors, Senior Technical Staff Member of Web & Blockchain Open Technologies at IBM

How are you or your company currently using Hyperledger technologies or how do you plan to?

IBM Blockchain offering is based on Hyperledger Fabric. After a period of development of proof of concepts we’ve now entered a phase in which we see more and more projects going into production. Some of these like Everledger and Maersk have been highly publicized already with the tracking of diamonds and shipping containers respectively. What I find interesting is that these projects show how broadly applicable blockchain technology really is. This goes way beyond cryptocurrencies.

What are the benefits of Hyperledger’s open governance model?

The power of Open Source is to make it possible for people with different backgrounds and skills to come together and work collaboratively to everybody’s benefit. Everyone gets more out of the project than they individually contribute. This model however only reaches its full potential with an open governance where all contributors are treated equally and have a say in the direction of the project. Without open governance, developers are merely treated as cheap resources willing to give their time and IP without any say as to where the project goes. Sadly, many projects typically led by big corporations do function like that. As I said earlier, it is my goal for Hyperledger to be truly open and part of my role at IBM has been to help our development team to switch from a closed development environment to open source. This doesn’t just happen. One needs to understand what it takes and apply themselves to it.

What’s the most important technical milestone for Hyperledger to reach by the end of 2017?

We’ve already seen the release of Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 earlier this year, Hyperledger Sawtooth and Hyperledger Iroha are working towards their own 1.0 release. I think it would be a great achievement to see those three projects, which were the first to start within Hyperledger, reach that major milestone by the end of the year.

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

Blockchain is a new technology. In many respects everybody’s still learning so it is a great time to get started. As more and more companies launch projects leveraging blockchain they will be seeking developers with the needed skills. Those who already worked on developing these skills will become valuable resources. Because all of the Hyperledger technologies are open source there is no cost to getting started. It is merely a matter of being willing to invest your time. Practically speaking, I would advise people to start by familiarizing themselves with the different projects to get some general understanding of the characteristics of the different frameworks. They all include documentation and tutorials that are can be used to get started.

What’s the one thing you hope to accomplish by being a part of Hyperledger’s TSC?

As mentioned before, if there is one thing I hope to accomplish it is to continue driving the project towards being truly open, with not only code in open source but also with an open governance. For example, last year, I took a leading role in the development of the Incubation exit criteria. These are criteria the TSC uses to gauge whether a project is ready to move out of Incubation into Active status. The fact that the criteria we defined are focusing on the maturity of the project – how the project is run, how diverse the community is, etc – rather than the maturity of the software that is developed is a reflection of that goal.

What’s a missing feature or spec that you hope Hyperledger can add in the soon future?

As we see more and more projects reach their 1.0 release, I hope we get more cross pollination happening between projects. For instance, an effort was recently put into integrating Borrow – a permissioned Ethereum virtual machine – with Sawtooth. I hope we get to see more of that kind of efforts happening moving forward.

What’s the biggest struggle or challenge you see Hyperledger having to overcome?

As understanding of the different major components of a blockchain framework improves, with help from the Architecture Working Group, it would be great to be able to identify pieces that can be externalized and shared by the different frameworks rather than have every project host its own. This is however not an easy task and with each project focusing on advancing its own framework it is difficult to get resources allocated to this kind of cross project effort. Once all the projects become more mature it should be easier to find resources for this but it will be harder to make significant changes to frameworks that have already been deployed in production.

What use cases are you most excited about with Hyperledger and/or blockchain?

Voting. Blockchain provides a distributed, secure, and audit-able record that fits perfectly the need of voting processes. What is more important than protecting our democracies?