All Posts By

Hyperledger

Introducing Hyperledger Labs!

By | Blog

Today, we’re excited to announce that the Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has voted to approve the launch of Hyperledger Labs! Hyperledger Labs aims to provide a channel suitable for innovation and testing of ideas where work can easily be started without the creation of a formal Hyperledger project. It will allow teams to experiment with new frameworks and new modules without the promise of stable code or MVP.

We believe Hyperledger Labs supports the main goal behind Hyperledger to help build communities by gathering people sharing a common interest in developing blockchain related software.

Why Hyperledger Labs?

Currently, the project lifecycle at Hyperledger requires projects to be started in Incubation and graduate to Active projects. However the only way to currently do this is to submit a project proposal and launch a formal project in Incubation. This is a relatively heavy process that requires a level of endorsement by Hyperledger that is not suitable for cases where projects are immature from a code-complete, production-quality, or community building perspective, or experimental.

Hyperledger Labs lowers the pressure on the TSC to start new projects and allow for work to be done within a legal framework that eases transition to a project in Incubation in cases where this ends up being the chosen path for the Labs.

What can be in Labs?

Examples of possible Labs include: projects too early for TSC approval as an incubator because there’s not a lot of code; demos; documentation examples; sample code from hackathons, research projects, etc.

There is no guarantee that a Lab will become an incubated or fully-fledged project at Hyperledger. If at any point a Lab wants to enter Incubation and become a formal project, a project proposal will need to be submitted for TSC consideration.

How will Labs work?

Hyperledger Labs is not directly controlled by the TSC. Labs are proposed and run by the community. They can be created by a simple request (done by submitting a Pull Request) to the Labs Stewards.

Labs Stewards act in oversight to ensure legal compliance, etc., and will produce a quarterly hyperledger-labs-wide “project” report to the TSC. To help the community understand the status of the different Labs, Stewards will also be responsible for curating the set of Labs, moving to an archives space those that become dormant or unresponsive for an extended period (6+ months), or are explicitly deemed by the committers to be deprecated/obsoleted. In case of issue with the Labs Stewards, requesters and/or committers can appeal to the TSC for arbitration.

The Labs Stewards will consist of the Hyperledger Community Architect(s), who are staff members of The Linux Foundation, and subsequently any volunteer from the community approved by the TSC. The initial list of Lab Stewards is:

  • Arnaud Le Hors
  • Vipin Bharathan
  • Bas van Oostveen
  • Tracy Kuhrt

Get involved!

We hope that Hyperledger Labs encourages more developers to get involved and experiment in the community. The following communication channels have been set up for Hyperledger Labs:

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Hyperledger Lab’s wiki or Github organization.

As always, we encourage developers to join our efforts via github, Rocket.Chat, the wiki or the mailing lists. You can also follow Hyperledger on Twitter or email us with any questions: info@hyperledger.org.

 

2018 Hyperledger Global Forum Announced

By | Announcements

Developers, vendors, enterprise end-users and enthusiasts of Hyperledger blockchain technologies to converge in Basel, Switzerland

SAN FRANCISCO, January 23, 2018 – Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, announced today the inaugural 2018 Hyperledger Global Forum, which will take place December 12-15 in Basel, Switzerland at the Congress Center Basel.

The 2018 Hyperledger Global Forum will convene the global enterprise blockchain community to advance these critical technologies. The agenda will comprise of both enterprise and technical tracks covering a mix of topics including blockchain in the enterprise, distributed ledger and smart contracts 101, roadmaps for Hyperledger projects, industry keynotes and use cases in development. There will also be social networking for the community to bond, and hacking activities with mentors to help facilitate software development collaboration and knowledge sharing to bring developers up the learning curve.

“This year’s Global Forum will be the premier event to collaborate and better understand Hyperledger blockchain technologies, real use cases and production deployment challenges facing enterprises today,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “For anyone still wrestling with how blockchain will transform businesses processes, and where their industry fits in, this is the perfect opportunity to learn more.”

Open to members and non-members alike, attendees will have the chance to talk directly with Hyperledger project maintainers and the Technical Steering Committee, collaborate with other organizations on ideas that will directly impact the future of Hyperledger, and promote their work among the communities.

A call for papers, keynote speakers and the conference schedule will be announced this summer. For more information about the 2018 Hyperledger Global Forum, please visit: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/hyperledger-global-forum-2018/

Help us spread the word! Click the following links to Tweet and share on your social networks using #HyperledgerForum.

Inaugural 2018 #HyperledgerForum announced! Learn more about the event here: http://bit.ly/2Dkpwby

Click to tweet: https://ctt.ec/xJ6CN

Developers, enterprise end-users & enthusiasts of Hyperledger blockchain technologies are headed to Europe in December for the Inaugural #HyperledgerForum. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2Dkpwby

Click to tweet: https://ctt.ec/90l6e

Don’t miss the Inaugural 2018 #HyperledgerForum happening Dec 12-15 in Basel, Switzerland. More details: http://bit.ly/2Dkpwby

Click to tweet: https://ctt.ec/J16ow

About Hyperledger

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and Technology. The Linux Foundation hosts Hyperledger under the Foundation. To learn more, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/.

Developer Showcase Series: George Theofilis, Synaphea

By | Blog

We return to our Developer Showcase blog series, which serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is George Theofilis, CTO of Synaphea. Let’s see what he has to say!

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

Get your theoretical background fortified, and start reading, now! Knowing it works is only half the skill, if you can’t explain how and why it works. This might force you to at least dab in economics or legal studies a bit, but it sure is worth your while.

Theoretical background is of major importance and so is market knowledge in order for a development team to quickly grasp the value of the solution they build.

A relatively novice programmer wishing to build a blockchain application with Hyperledger should definitely possess an adequate basic understanding of Docker as well as some fluency in the Go programming language.

George Theofilis, CTO of Synaphea

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

For me it started with academic curiosity during my years in the university. From there it grew into something more very quickly, supported by the hype of the bitcoin community. What my startup and I are working on right now is a wide array of tools for smart-contract management – which began as ways to make our daily lives easier – and an aggregation system for easy deployment for smart-contracts over many blockchain implementations and networks, both public and privately owned.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

I think blockchain technology would help us to further the digitization of the public sector. Thus making public management more transparent and efficient. One such application of blockchain would be digital IDs or an application that would issue needed credentials in an automated way.

What is the best piece of developer advice you’ve ever received?

Every day try to learn a new thing and to push yourself to your limits, is the only way to mastering computer programming.

What technology could you not live without?

On a matter of lifestyle I think it’s the internet. It became synonymous with the western way of life. But on a more pragmatic approach it would definitely be electricity. Humanity depends much on electric current for its survival.

(1.18.18) CoinDesk: Enterprise Blockchain Is Ready to Go Live in 2018

By | Hyperledger Fabric, News

Talk to enterprise blockchain enthusiasts and they will tell you about the potential use cases in their industries and the proofs-of-concept they have run to prove blockchain value in the enterprise.

Ask them about production deployments… and they demur, pointing out implementation challenges and production-readiness gaps.

Will this change in 2018 and will we see a significant shift from experimentation to production deployments of enterprise blockchains?

More here. 

 

(1.17.18) Healthcare Informatics: Change Healthcare Announces Availability of Enterprise-Scale Blockchain Solution

By | News

Executives from Nashville-based Change Healthcare have announced that its Intelligent Healthcare Network with blockchain is now available featuring claims management transparency, attesting that it is the first enterprise-scale blockchain in healthcare.

Leveraging blockchain technology, organizations can accurately track, in real time, the status of claims submission and remittance across the complete claim lifecycle. “The single source of truth created by a blockchain will spark innovative new services for a more streamlined, patient-centric health system,” Change Healthcare officials noted in a press release.

More here.

Data Model Considerations in Hyperledger Sawtooth

By | Blog, Hyperledger Sawtooth

Guest post: Zac Delventhal, Hyperledger Sawtooth maintainer, Bitwise IO

Hyperledger Sawtooth is an enterprise blockchain platform for building distributed ledger applications and networks. Sawtooth simplifies blockchain application development by separating the core system from the application domain. Application developers can specify the business rules appropriate for their application, using the language of their choice, without needing to know the underlying design of the core system.

In this blog post though, we wanted to get past the “Hello World” content and talk about some of that underlying design to allow advanced developers to extract more performance. (TLDR: Read this design doc). Sawtooth relies on a merkle radix data structure as the underlying data store. This differs from Hyperledger Fabric, but is common with some other blockchain implementations.

If you are just getting started with Sawtooth you really don’t need to understand any of this, but if you are interested in digging deeper or are working on an intensive blockchain application there’s some design considerations to think through on your data model.

Let’s say we have some resources we plan to store as UTF-8 encoded JSON strings. You can use any byte encoding you like, and there are better options than JSON, but this will give us something familiar and human readable as an example. Our resources are going to have a pretty simple structure, just a unique id, a description, and an array of numbers:

  {

    "id": "123",

    "description": "An example resource",

    "numbers": [4, 5, 6]

  } 

 

So now we have to decide how to store this data on the merkle radix tree. Sawtooth addresses are made up of 35-bytes, typically represented as 70 hexadecimal characters. The first six characters are the namespace for our transaction family, but the final 64 characters we can use however we like. Let’s go through three possible setups we could choose:

  1. All of our data is stored at a single address.
  2. Each resource is stored its own address.
  3. Each resource is stored over multiple addresses.

One Address For Everything

This is an absurd design only appropriate for the most rudimentary hello world examples. But why is it absurd? Exploring that should provide some useful insights. Let’s say we just take all of our data, and throw it in one JSON object indexed by the resource ids:

{

    "123": { "id": "123", "description": ... },

    "456": { "id": "456", "description": ... },

   ...

 

And we store this massive string at whatever our namespace is plus 64 zeros:

  123456 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000:

    '{"123":{"id":"123","description":...},"456":{"id":"456",...'

  }

(Note that the space after the namespace in the addresses above are just for illustration purposes. Sawtooth addresses do not have spaces.)

From a certain perspective this may be attractive for its simplicity. You don't need to think about addressing at all! You just always read/write from the one address and pull up whatever JSON is there. There are unfortunately two big downsides to this approach:

  • First, you now need to read/write a lot of data anytime you want to make a modification. Anytime anything changes, you will be parsing a huge JSON string, updating some small part of the resulting data, then re-encoding it as JSON and writing it back to the merkle tree. With any number of resources this will quickly become a huge performance bottleneck.
  • Second, you will have hamstrung one of Sawtooth's greatest strengths: parallelism. Sawtooth validators are capable of simultaneously validating multiple transactions, but if those transactions are trying to write to the same address, they cannot be executed in parallel, and must be validated sequentially.  So with all of our data in a single address we guarantee validators will only ever work on one transaction at a time.

One Address per Resource

This approach is a little more sensible and still fairly simple. While you don't get to ignore addressing completely, all you really need to do is to find a way to turn each resource's unique identifier into 64 hex characters. A common method is to just take the first 64 characters of a hash. Here's how we would store our example resource above if we took the SHA-512 hash of the “id” field:

123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c047e7ab1c1:

    '{"id":"123","description":"An example resource","numbers":[4,5,6]}'

This is likely the approach you'll see in many applications. It is easy to reason about, and as long as each resource is not too large, or updated too frequently, performance should be reasonable. But what if we do have large or frequently updated resources? Could we split this up further?

One Resource over Multiple Addresses

64 hex characters provides us with trillions and trillions of potential addresses. There is no reason not to get as fine-grained as we like with them. For example we could use the first 60 characters for a hash of the identifier, and then use the remaining 4 characters for a hash of each property name:

123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c047e7a f0bc:

    '{id:"123","name":"id","value":"123"}'

  123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c047e7a 384f:

    '{id:"123","name":"description","value":"An example resource"}'

  123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c047e7a 542a:

    '{id:"123","name":"numbers","value":[4,5,6]}'

This is also a pretty absurd example. In order to reconstruct the resource later we have to spell out the property name and include the resource id repeatedly. Overall we are storing a lot more data, but we have minimized the amount of data we need read/write in each update. Also, while our validator can now do some fancy tricks like updating the "description" at the same time it updates the "number", that probably isn't important with our tiny little array of three numbers.

But what if we had thousands of numbers that changed frequently? We could instead use those last address characters as array indexes. Something like this:

  123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c04 00000000:

    '{id:"123","description":"An example resource","nextIndex":4}'

  123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c04 00000001:

    '{id:"123","number":4}'

  123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c04 00000002:

    '{id:"123","number":5}'

  123456 3c9909afec25354d551dae21590bb26e38d53f2173b8d3dc3eee4c04 00000003:

    '{id:"123","number":6}'

So now we are using 56 characters for the id hash, and reserving the last eight for pieces of the resource, which gives us room for a few billion pieces. All of the basic resource info is at 00000000, while any remaining addresses each store a single number.

This is starting to get pretty complex, and reconstructing this resource later will be a pain, but adding a new numbers has become extremely simple. Imagine the array was 10,000 items long. In any of the previous designs we would have had to parse that entire gigantic string and then re-encode it, just to add one item. With this design, we just add a new entry to the next index. Also, the validator can be highly parallelized now. Adding new numbers, updating the description, and changing existing numbers can all happen at the same time.

Conclusion

There is no one correct answer or strategy when it comes to structuring your data model. You'll need to decide for yourself what is appropriate based on your developer and application needs. In Sawtooth Supply Chain, we have "Record" resources with multiple arrays of telemetry data that could be updated on a second by second basis, and might stretch to millions of entries. So Records are highly split up in a manner similar to the numbers example above. Logically we are just pushing to an array, but in practice we needed to break that into different buckets. For a full discussion of this pattern take a look at the supply chain doc on the subject.

By contrast, in Sawtooth Marketplace there wasn't as much opportunity or need to do anything so complex, and it follows uses a simple one address per resource pattern.

If you’re interested, you can learn more about Hyperledger Sawtooth and see real world examples of how the technology is being used. You can also read the documentation, join the community on RocketChat or pull the code from GitHub to kick the tires today.

Zac Delventhal is senior software engineer at Bitwise IO, and a maintainer on Hyperledger Sawtooth. When bored, he can be found giving overly long explanations about Hyperledger concepts in blog posts or on RocketChat.

Making Legal Contracts Smart

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer, Hyperledger Fabric

Guest post: Dan Selman and Houman Shadab, Clause.io

The potential to automate a wide variety of business transactions in a way that is secure, transparent, and flexible will likely be one of the most transformational benefits of blockchain. However, software applications that use distributed ledger technology to automate business processes are often confusingly referred to as “smart contracts” despite not being tied to any legally binding obligation or, worse still, not being enforceable in court. In contrast are smart legal contracts: legally binding agreements whose underlying logic is transformed through computation to enable automation, software connectivity, and dynamic business arrangements.  

Automated transactions must be executed according to the terms of a legally binding agreement to provide companies with certainty and the ability to be compensated if something goes wrong. Smart contracts that are executed apart from a legal agreement cannot be fully integrated into an enterprise digital transformation strategy. Fundamental transformation requires consolidating systems end-to-end and involving a company’s legal agreements. And even if legally enforceable, smart contracts that operate without incorporating standards will likely be an isolated phenomenon without the full benefit of marketwide adoption. Worse still, smart contracts that are inaccessible to legal and business professionals are likely to remain more of a curiosity than transformational.

The Accord Project was established, in part, to develop a community driven protocol for smart legal contracting. It is built on the fundamental notion that contracting is, and should be, blockchain agnostic. Users are therefore able to use Hyperledger Fabric, Ethereum, and others as warranted. The Accord Project is an Associate Member of Hyperledger and is a consortium of attorneys, technologists, and organizations collaborating to set techno-legal standards and develop open source technology. But it’s not just talk. The Accord Project has already operationalized its vision through the open source software called “Cicero.”

Cicero enables lawyers and business professionals to turn traditional, legally binding agreements into smart legal contracts. It accomplishes this through an easy-to-use system for enabling legal contracts to be executed in response to external data and be connected to a wide variety of software systems and platforms, including blockchain.

The “virtuous triangle” of functionality implemented by Cicero templates.

The core of Cicero is a smart contract templating system made up of three components. The first is a template’s grammar, which consists of natural language contract text that identifies data-oriented variables such as price, date, etc. Second is the template’s data model that provides a framework for categorizing the variables and the components of the business context that operationalize smart contracts. Once the elements of a legal contract and the business context are categorized with a data-oriented modeling language, the contract can then be executed using the template’s operational logic — the third component of Cicero’s smart contract templating system.

We chose the Hyperledger Composer modeling language because it is a great fit for smart legal contracts and is able to be put to use immediately. Composer is general enough to model any type of contract and make them executable in a variety of environments — a core requirement the Accord Project’s protocol agnosticism.

Hyperledger Composer’s primary elements correspond to the basics of smart legal contracting. Composer’s participant element corresponds to the contracting parties and its asset element corresponds to the goods, services, and other subject matter of a contract. Composer’s transactions element causes assets to be exchanged and, importantly for smart legal contracts, are the means by which external data about assets trigger business logic. Examples of transactions include sending payment when data indicates assets have been delivered, or sending notice of breach when data indicates a temperature condition is violated. Other elements of Composer map well to contracting, including those that capture types of assets (e.g., red, medium), the state of contract (e.g., past due, in-process), and basic terms such as party addresses.

The Accord Project has created an open source repository for Cicero templates and is inviting all those interested in creating a smart legal contract ecosystem to contribute. The full documentation is located here. For more information about joining the Accord Project and the discussion on slack, please visit our website: www.accordproject.org.

Perishable Goods Example

To make things concrete, let’s take a look at an example Hyperledger Composer business network (executing on Hyperledger Fabric v1) which invokes Cicero running on an out-process standalone web server. Hyperledger Fabric stores the state of assets on the blockchain, while Cicero executes contract logic off-chain.

Installation instructions for the demo are here: https://github.com/accordproject/cicero-perishable-network

Hyperledger Composer is used to store the state of shipments, importers, growers, shippers on the blockchain, while the contract logic is invoked out-of-process using the Cicero Server.

High-level architecture for the cicero-perishable-network demo.

Note: it is also possible to embed Cicero execution inside Hyperledger Fabric v1.1-preview, thanks to the support for executing Node.js chaincode.

The Hyperledger Composer Playground can be used to visualize and interact with the data stored on the blockchain.

Shipments being tracked on the blockchain.

The identities of the participants in the permissioned blockchain are managed by Hyperledger Fabric, and their metadata is managed by Hyperledger Composer and is visible in the Hyperledger Composer Playground.

Permissioned access enforced by Hyperledger Fabric, and business network Participant state stored on the blockchain.

Hyperledger Composer playground can be used to interactively test the logic for the business network, submitting transactions that update the state of assets stored on the blockchain, based on the results of executing a Cicero contract.

Simulating submitting IoT transactions using Hyperledger Composer

Behind the Scenes

Both Hyperledger Composer and Cicero are fundamentally strongly-typed and model driven, so we start by defining the data model, and because both Hyperledger Composer and Cicero use the same modelling language, there is no need for complex model mapping when calling from one to the other.

The Composer data model, showing the Shipment asset that is being stored on the blockchain, as well as some of the transactions that update the state of the shipment.

The Hyperledger Composer business network includes a transaction processor function (chaincode) that invokes the Cicero server.

A Composer transaction processor function for the ShipmentReceived transaction. On Line 32 you can see the call to the Cicero server, passing in data from the incoming transaction. After calling Cicero the function can update the state of assets on the blockchain.

You can then create a new (or use an existing) Cicero template. Here we are using the perishable-goods template from the Cicero Template Library at https://github.com/accordproject/cicero-template-library.

The grammar for a Cicero template. The grammar is the natural language text for the clause with embedded variables.

A Cicero template is strongly-typed and the type-information is captured in the template’s Template Model.

The Template Model for the perishable-goods Cicero template. The Template Model captures the names and types for variables referenced in the template grammar. Note that it can reference or include complex types, such as Shipment or Duration.

Cicero combines the Template Grammar and Template Model and uses them to generate a parser for the template. The parser takes input source text and converts it to an instance of the Template Model.

Finally Cicero templates include the executable business logic which implements a function that receives an incoming transaction and the clause data, and returns a response transaction.

Some of the business logic for the perishable-goods template, written in JavaScript. Note that the Accord Project is working on a Domain Specific Language for capturing contract logic.

For more information, and the full source code, please refer to:

 

(1.11.18) CIO Dive: Hyperledger sets eyes on the long road for blockchain

By | News

If it seemed blockchain was an inescapable buzzword in 2017, consider the evidence. Google searches for “blockchain” rose steadily, picking up significantly toward the end of 2017.

For many, “blockchain” may have been a successive query following the furrowed brows and glassy eyes elicited by “Bitcoin” and “How to buy bitcoin,” two of the most popular global Google searches in 2017.

More here.

Developer Showcase Series: Piers Casimir-Mrowczynski, BWPS

By | Blog, Hyperledger Composer

Our Developer Showcase blog series serves to highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger’s incubated projects. Next up is Piers Casimir-Mrowczynski, head of computer science at BWPS. Let’s see what he has to say!

What advice would you offer other technologists or developers interested in getting started working on blockchain?

The way forward is a combination of the academic and the practical. Buy one of the well regarded Blockchain/Bitcoin books. Dive in and it will reward you with a real sense of blockchain warmth and wellbeing coupled with a solid architectural background. Follow it with a highly accessible and well formed blockchain solution builder such as Hyperledger Composer. You’ll then move from the theory to the practice. It’s a brilliant way to begin your blockchain journey!

Piers Casimir-Mrowczynski, head of computer science at BWPS

Give a bit of background on what you’re working on, and let us know what was it that made you want to get into blockchain?

Aside from a continued assimilation and accumulation of knowledge, I’ve been prototyping a document management and ownership recording system aimed at the Compliance function you would find in a Hedge Fund. Such immutable applications are the bread and butter of what blockchain can achieve and support. Hyperledger Composer, running on a Linux platform, and its associated elements, is ideally suited to such a blockchain application, where ease of development and confidence in the underlining architecture are imperative.

For me, Blockchain is an incredibly exciting new technology. There’s a certain irony though, that when I was 17, back in the late 70’s, studying at college, many blockchain related technologies already existed. I was learning about stacks, arrays, basic cryptography and hash totals. It feels a little like coming back home and taking these old technologies forward in a new and much more sophisticated way. Blockchain is a truly exciting phenomenon just waiting to mature.

What do you think is most important for Hyperledger to focus on in the next year?

For me it’s education, education and education. There needs to be a focus on Hyperledger specific education for its many business application solution builders. Technical infrastructure, business network solution planning as well as supporting the development, testing and implementation project lifecycle are all important.

With sound and accessible education in place, anything is possible. It starts with management understanding and then builds from there. Hyperledger is the future of mainstream blockchain applications and with the plethora of educational tools and resources, both old school as well as new technology based, there are simply now no excuses for not building world class educational resources.

What’s the one issue or problem you hope blockchain can solve?

It’s a non-technical one; that management gain the understanding and confidence needed to champion the development of blockchain applications that provide real world solutions for real world benefit. Once those foundations are in place, great solutions will follow. In addition, the open source mentality will go a long way in supporting eco-friendly, sustainable and ethical resolutions to real first and third world problems.

Where do you hope to see Hyperledger and/or blockchain in 5 years?

I see greater acceptance, better understanding and the realisation that blockchain is much more than a Bitcoin facilitation platform. Hyperledger feels like the solid, proven technology that will satisfy both the technical and non-technical innovators and implementers. This business as usual approach will disrupt the traditional applications and their associated corporate users and I hope this will support the very real creation of innovative and positive organic business solutions.

What is the best piece of developer advice you’ve ever received?

Plan first, build and test, test and test again. And actually talk to your users about what they want – before development begins. Keep it simple.

What technology could you not live without?

Easy. My Apple Mac. ( And a flushing toilet ).

(1.10.18) Distributed: Hyperledger’s Brian Behlendorf and How Blockchains Will Change the Enterprise World

By | News

Verticals such as finance, supply chain and healthcare are obvious targets for distributed ledger technology (DLT), and publishers, utilities and governments are also ramping up their interest in adoption. Companies in many other sectors are dabbling too.

One organization that is helping businesses learn and evaluate blockchains is Hyperledger, an open-source collaborative effort hosted by the Linux Foundation. The group counts organizations such as Change Healthcare, Daimler, IBM, Cisco and Intel as “premier” members and it has launched nine projects to date, including the Hyperledger Fabric, Sawtooth and Iroha blockchain frameworks.

More here.